Archive for the ‘Poker stats’ Category

Partypoker Withdraws from Australia

 Partypoker Withdraws from Australia

The fallout from the recent online gaming regulatory changes in Australia continues, as partypoker has announced that it will be withdrawing from the country’s internet poker market, effective August 31st.

In a brief statement, which can be found on the website of party’s parent company, GVC Holdings, partypoker said:

It has been announced that Australian gambling law is due to change imminently with the introduction of the Interactive Gambling Amendment Act. Sadly, because of this change, gambling firms licenced and operating outside of Australia will be forced to prevent customers resident in Australia from playing on their gambling websites. Therefore, from 31st August 2017 partypoker players will no longer be able to play from Australia. Players’ deposited funds are safe and available for withdrawal.

partypoker Managing Director Tom Waters said, “We regret that this day has come as Australia is a strong poker market. We will continue to work with the Australian player alliance to lobby the government to provide a safe regulated environment for residents to play online poker in the future.”

This decision stems from the approval of changes to the Interactive Gambling Amendment Bill 2016 a couple weeks ago by the Australian Senate. The bill states that all online gambling operators must apply for and be granted a license to offer their services to people in the country. This is certainly not unreasonable – we poker fans here in the United States want government licensure and regulation – and normally partypoker would look to apply for such a license. The problem in this case is that the only form of online gambling for which licenses are available is sports betting.

Thus, in order to operate in Australia, partypoker would have to work in violation of the country’s gambling laws, as it will literally be impossible for the company to receive an online poker license. None will exist. So, rather than be a rogue operator – and there will be rogue operators – partypoker has decided to withdraw from the market completely.

The new gambling law has not taken effect just yet; they will start up 28 days after the bill is signed by Sir Peter Cosgrove, Australia’s Governor-General. This act, called “Royal Assent,” took place on August 16th, so it looks like September 13th is the day of reckoning for online poker in Australia.

Partypoker is not the first online gambling site to pull out of Australia. Bingo site Vera&John led the way in December. 888poker became the first online poker site to do so, withdrawing in January. PokerStars announced that it would likely do so a while back, finally confirming as such approximately a week ago. We would expect most other online poker rooms to follow suit, provided they do not want to be on the wrong side of the law.

As partypoker mentioned, player funds are safe – they just won’t be useable as of August 31st. We would suggest players cash out their poker funds as soon as possible, not because they won’t be there come September, but just in case the process gets more complicated once partypoker shuts down in Australia.

Poker News Daily

AB, UB Claims Approval E-mails Hitting Inboxes

 AB, UB Claims Approval E mails Hitting Inboxes

On Friday, Garden City Group, the claims administrator for the Absolute Poker and UltimateBet remissions process, began sending out e-mails to former players of the two online poker rooms, confirming the approvals of claims.

AP and UB, which together comprised the CEREUS Network, are infamous in online poker history both for their superuser scandals perpetrated by some of the highest ranking people at the companies and for disappearing after Black Friday in 2011. Of course, in exiting stage left, the two poker rooms also vanished their customers’ money.

We all figured that was that for our poker funds on deposit with AP and UB; I wasn’t happy, but my life wasn’t over for losing $ 60 that I was just putzing around with, anyway. Others, though lost thousands upon thousands of dollars. Real money. So it came as a happy surprise when the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York announced in April that former customers of AP and UB would be able to submit claims for their missing funds, apparently using the excess from the Full Tilt Poker refund process to fund the payouts.

The applications for remission opened after that announcement was made. Players could submit their application using a Petition number and Control number found in an e-mail from the Garden City Group or with their login credentials for the poker rooms. I used the latter, as it had been so long since I checked my e-mail address used with AP and UB that was dormant and did not receive the e-mail.

And it was Friday that I and hopefully thousands of others received e-mails (one for each poker room) saying our applications were approved. Now it is on to the next step, which is submitting bank account information so that an electronic funds transfer can be received. Payments will supposedly be sent out in 4-6 weeks.

If you are not sure if you received the approval e-mail, check your spam folder and/or look for the subject line, “Absolute Poker Claims Administration Notice Regarding Payment” from AbsolutePokerDoNotReply@tgcginc.com. The e-mails for both Absolute Poker and UltimateBet have the same subject line and are from the same “do not reply” e-mail address.

Here is what the e-mails say (with pertinent personal information removed):

The purpose of this email is to inform you that your Petition for Remission has been approved and you are entitled to receive a distribution from the assets forfeited by PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker, and Absolute Poker (the “Fund”), in connection with the settlement agreement resolving allegations in the amended civil forfeiture complaint in United States v. PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker, Absolute Poker, et al., 11 Civ. 2564 (LBS), in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (the “Action”).

You will be receiving the distribution in the form of a domestic ACH payment. To enter your banking information and authorize GCG to electronically credit your account, please visit the administration website at www.AbsolutePokerClaims.com and click on the “Update Bank Information” tab located on the sidebar of the website. Log-in using the below Petition Number and Control Number, please enter all required banking information for the account you would like to receive the electronic ACH payment. When logging in, please use your last name as verification.

Petition Number: xxxxxxx

Control Number: xxxxxxxxxx

By properly submitting your banking information, you will receive an ACH payment in the amount of $ xx.xx to the account number specified. This payment represents the full amount of your Absolute Poker / Ultimate Bet account balance which you confirmed on the Absolute Poker Claims Administration’s website. Payment will be issued within four to six weeks of submitting your information, so please submit your information as soon as possible.

If you have any questions, you can call us toll-free at (855) 907-3254, email us at info@AbsolutePokerClaims.com, or write to us at Absolute Poker Claims Administration, c/o GCG, P.O. Box 10277, Dublin, Ohio 43017-5777. For additional information you may also visit the administration website at www.AbsolutePokerClaims.com.

Poker News Daily

PokerStars Announces Withdrawal from Australia

 PokerStars Announces Withdrawal from Australia

PokerStars has sent an e-mail to its Australian players that it will withdraw from the Australia market in mid-September following the passage of a new online gambling bill in the country. The Interactive Gambling Amendment Bill (2016) passed parliament on August 9th and effectively bars all internet gaming sites that are not licensed in Australia. PokerStars does not have such a license.

Now, one’s initial reaction might be that PokerStars will just apply for a license, eventually be granted one, and Aussies can start playing again. And that would be a reasonable thought, but unfortunately, that won’t happen. The bill permits online gambling, but only of the sports betting variety. As sports betting operators are the only ones, therefore, who would be able to apply for a license, online poker operators like PokerStars have no way of complying with the law. Well, no way except to get out of Dodge.

PokerStars had already announced that there was a high likelihood it would leave Australia, so this comes as no surprise, even though it is disappointing. The exact withdrawal date depends on when the law goes into effect, but it is expected in roughly the middle part of next month.

Online bingo site Vera&John was the first online gambling site to exit Australia, doing so in December 2016. 888poker was the first poker site to do it, leaving the country in January of this year.

Below is the entire statement issued to Australian players by PokerStars:

The Australian parliament on August 9 passed the Interactive Gambling Amendment Bill (2016) effectively banning all online gambling sites that are not locally licensed under Australian State or Territory law. We’ve been aware of this day coming and have done our best to keep you informed, but we can confirm that we’ll be closing our real money poker tables to players in Australia, most likely around mid-September. We will contact you as soon as a firm date is confirmed.

Your funds are, and will continue to be, safe and available for withdrawal. Remember to open any unopened Stars Rewards Chests you have, and you can continue to spend your StarsCoin in the Rewards Store. A $ 1 Cash Rebate has been added to facilitate converting your StarsCoin to cash. Any tournament tickets and tournament money will be converted to cash for withdrawal, effective from the market exit date. We have provided a FAQ page here.

We’re proud to have seen the Australian poker community grow so strong over the last decade. We do respect the Australian Government’s decision in taking steps to protect consumers and hope that in time we’ll be able to serve real money poker to you again. In the meantime, we will continue to offer play money poker and we hope to continue to welcome many Australian players to our tables.

We’d also like to thank the Australian Online Poker Alliance for their campaigning on behalf of the game and suggest that you consider lending them your voice if you’d like to see a regulated return of online poker to Australia.

Poker News Daily

Martin Kozlov Wins 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Championship

 Martin Kozlov Wins 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Championship

It looked like it was going to be a long final table at the 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Championship (SHRPO) Tuesday as even though Aaron Mermelstein had a comfortable chip lead, almost everyone at the table had a fairly deep stack. And with nine players beginning the last day of play, there was a chance it could go on for a while.

And for a while it did. Only one player was knocked out in each of the first four hour and a half-long levels; by the time Martin Kozlov collected all the chips to win three-quarters of a million dollars, the final table had spanned 13 hours.

The SHRPO was also organized in quite a unique way, adding more emphasis to how slow the pace of the Championship final table really was. The tournament festival had what it called the “Big 4” events: the $ 1,100 No-Limit Hold’em Re-entry event, the $ 5,250 Championship Event, the $ 2,650 Freeze Out, and the $ 25,500 High Roller Re-entry event. Though the other three events began before the Championship, they were all scheduled in such a way so as to have all of their final tables play out in the same room on Tuesday.

Joe Keuther, the short stack at the Championship final table and the first one to be eliminated, was actually at two final tables at the same time, so while he was likely disappointed to finish ninth, he was able to just saunter over to the $ 1,100 No-Limit Hold’em final table and keep going (he finished eighth there).

Kozlov commented on the four final table arrangement and the pace of his table in his post-game interview with SHRPO officials, saying:

They had The Big 4, and after two or three hours all the tables of the other three were down to four or five players, and it took us six hours to lose two players. It was super slow, and you just had to play it one hand at a time. The structure was so good you could afford to take some beats, you could afford to lose some pots. Patience was the most important thing I guess.

He needed that patience, too, as he found himself very short stacked with five players remaining, holding barely more than 10 big blinds.

“The thing that affects my mental state the most is if I’m getting downward momentum, if I’m getting upward momentum it just kind of clears my mind to focus on the strategy,” Kozlov said afterward. “So when things are going right I’m thinking more clearly about what to do strategy-wise, if things are going bad I’m just steaming.”

“Five handed I didn’t have many chips at all, and I was a bit tilted on break. I was talking to my wife, and I was like, ‘What am I going to do now. There’s not much left, I’m going to have to win a couple of all ins.’ And then I came back and won every all in, and now I’ve won the tournament.”

What was that about a chip and chair again?

Kozlov entered heads-up play against Dylan Drazen with a 6 million chip lead, 16.325 million to 10.325 million. He never fell behind during the one-on-one match, though Drazen did pull within less than 1.5 million. Interestingly, it was when Drazen was at his closest that the whole thing ended.

Kozlov raised to 600,000 pre-flop and Drazen called. On the flop of K-Q-8, Drazen checked and then called Kozlov’s 400,000 chip bet. It was the same action on the turn when a 4 was dealt, this time for 2.6 million chips. And then again, when a 2 landed on the river, Drazen called, Kozlov moved all-in, and then Drazen called all-in. Kozlov revealed pocket Kings for flopped top set, while Drazen had just J-8 for third pair, almost a bluff call.

The win put Kozlov well over $ 2 million in career live earnings, increasing his total to $ 2,680,977.

2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Championship – Final Table Results

1. Martin Kozlov – $ 754,083
2. Dylan Drazen – $ 528,322
3. Matt Berkey – $ 341,618
4. Yi Chi Li – $ 252,481
5. Michael Aron – $ 191,437
6. Aaron Mermelstein – $ 152,547
7. Adam Levy – $ 126,305
8. Luke Brererton – $ 100,408
9. Joe Kuether – $ 75,413

Poker News Daily

2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event Day 2: Aaron Mermelstein in Command

 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event Day 2: Aaron Mermelstein in Command

The Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event is one of the few “major” live poker tournaments on the calendar not to be associated with a larger tour like the World Poker Tour, PokerStars Championship, or World Series of Poker. Yesterday was a busy day for the SHRPO, as the 266 players who made it through Day 1 were whittled to just 30 by the end of Day 2, crossing the money bubble in the process (“crossing”?). Aaron Mermelstein leads with 2.706 million chips, the only player above the 2 million chip mark.

Mermelstein’s biggest hand of the day and the one that really gave him his upwards momentum, came during Level 19 with 45 players remaining. Pre-flop, he raised to 27,000, only to see Ashton Griffin three-bet to 70,000. After the rest of the table folded, Mermelstein called to bring on a flop of 2-9-T. The action went check-check and a King was dealt on the turn. Mermelstein checked again, Griffin bet 115,000 chips, but then Mermelstein check-raised to 265,000, a bet which Griffin called. With a 6 on the river, Mermelstein bet 400,000 chips, more than what Griffin had left in his stack. Griffin made the call for his remaining 290,000 chips and turned over pocket tens for a flopped set. Mermelstein, though, had 8-7 suited for a rivered straight. Griffin was out of the tournament in 45th place, while Mermelstein grew his chip stack to 1.8 million.

Aaron Mermelstein has just over $ 2 million in lifetime live tournament earnings, according to TheHendonMob.com. Most of his cashes are in the four to mid-five figure range, though his largest is $ 712,305, which he achieved by winning a $ 3,500 No-Limit Hold’em event at the 2015 Borgata Winter Poker Open. He has a couple recent cashes in major events, including a 426th place finish in the World Series of Poker Main Event and a 39th place finish in the World Poker Tour Choctaw Main Event.

One interesting player left with chips is Joe Kuether, who made the final table of the $ 1,100 event at the SHRPO. Normally, that is just cool, seeing someone make deep runs in two events, but in this case, it could pose a problem for him (a good one). The final table of the $ 1,100 event has not been run yet – it will take place on Tuesday. So, if he makes it far enough in the SHRPO Main Event, Kuether might end up getting some exercise running back and forth between tournaments.

The plan for Monday is to play down to the nine-handed final table. Everyone beginning Monday’s action is already guaranteed at least $ 19,531, with the last player to be eliminated Monday afternoon or evening receiving $ 61,303.

2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event – Day 2 Chip Leaders

1. Aaron Mermelstein – 2,706,000
2. Adam Levy – 1,960,000
3. Yi Chi Li – 1,816,000
4. Matt Berkey – 1,795,000
5. Samuel Bernabeu – 1,285,000
6. Odie Dardon – 1,154,000
7. David Sands – 1,044,000
8. Glenn Becker – 1,029,000
9. Michael Aron – 1,000,000
10. Diana Shirey – 923,000

Poker News Daily



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