Posts Tagged ‘Beat’

Poker Players Await Ruling on Stations Casino Bad Beat Jackpot Denial

 Poker Players Await Ruling on Stations Casino Bad Beat Jackpot Denial

When you think you have the goods in a poker hand and lose big, it hurts. But when you think you have the goods, lose big, but in turn hit a casino’s Bad Beat Jackpot, it feels amazing. Now take that to the next, depressing level and think you won the Bad Beat Jackpot only to have the casino say, “Not so fast, my friend.”

That is the situation facing poker players who were playing at the Station casinos on July 7th at about noon. According to a report by the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Len Schreter beat Avi Shamir in a poker game at Red Rock Resort with a straight flush over straight flush. As this qualified for the Bad Beat Jackpot (it looks like Aces full must be beaten and both hole cards must be used; if Aces full, one hole card must be an Ace), a sign lit up in every Station poker room, indicating that everyone playing at the moment might have just one a piece of the jackpot.

The Bad Beat Jackpot, funded with a maximum one dollar drop from every cash game hand at every Station casino, was up to about $ 120,000, so Shamir, as the loser of the hand, had won $ 60,000. Schreter, the winner, was to receive $ 30,000, and the rest of the players at the Station poker tables were to split up the rest of the prize pool evenly.

But Red Rock poker manager Forrest Caldwell, after talking it over with the top brass, invalidated the jackpot win. Surveillance footage showed that Schreter had turned over his cards out of turn after the river card was dealt. According to the Bad Beat Jackpot promotion’s rules, “discussion of hands during the play by players, at the discretion of management, may void a Jumbo Hold ‘Em Jackpot,” and management interpreted Schreter’s action as discussion of the hand.

Players asked the Nevada Gaming Control Board (NGCB) to review the case and investigator Bill Olliges determined that Schreter’s action did not affect the outcome of the hand, so the Bad Beat Jackpot should be paid out.

Station appealed and a hearing was held last week where Station presented its case. While the video footage made it obvious that Schreter had shown his cards before he was supposed to, the LVRJ report does not say whether or not the betting had occurred as such so as to make his action inconsequential.

If Shamir was already all-in (and other players had folded), Schreter showing his cards didn’t matter. If Shamir still had chips and therefore was going to need to make some sort of decision in the hand, Schreter showing he had the best straight flush definitely made a difference. Without knowledge of Schreter’s hand, there was no way Shamir was going to fold.

Since Olliges had already ruled that Schreter’s enthusiastic reveal did not affect the outcome, it seems like Shamir had no further opportunity to act in the hand, but the LVRJ report does not make that clear.

For his part, Schreter feels terrible about everything.

“I was hurt emotionally by Red Rock, but this guy [Shamir] was hurt financially,” he said in his testimony. “Red Rock kicked me in the stomach, but Red Rock kicked him in a place a lot lower than that.”

Michael Bluestein, who was playing at Santa Fe Station when the bad beat happened and would therefore be due a small portion of the jackpot, said at the hearing that the motivation for Station not to pay out was “pure greed.”

It does seem odd that Station would get so uptight about paying out a Bad Beat Jackpot that was funded by a drop the players paid in cash games. The payout is not coming from Station’s coffers. The only real reason one could think of for not paying is that the giant jackpot amount attracted more players and Station didn’t want to see its poker room traffic decrease with a reset jackpot.

Then again, by being so shitty about it, Station might lose customers, anyway.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal says the NGCB will likely consider hearing officer’s recommendation when it meets January 10th and 11th.

The post Poker Players Await Ruling on Stations Casino Bad Beat Jackpot Denial appeared first on Poker News Daily.

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PokerStars Launches Beat the Clock Tourneys

 PokerStars Launches Beat the Clock Tourneys

PokerStars introduced a new game variation today and for once, it wasn’t a type of Spin & Go. In “Beat the Clock” games, it is not winning that matters (it still does, of course) as much as it is not getting eliminated.

That may sound like the same thing, so allow me to explain. PokerStars Beat the Clock games are one dollar, 48-player Sit-and-Go tournaments played with the fast fold, Zoom Poker format. As a reminder, that last part means that as soon as a player folds, he is taken to a different table to immediately play a new hand. In a large enough Zoom Poker cash game pool, this may mean that a player won’t see the same opponents for quite some time, but with a field of only 48, the same players will be facing each other over and over again.

The big catch in Beat the Clock, though, is that all games last five minutes, max. They could end before that if 47 players are eliminated, but even if multiple players are still alive, the tournament will end automatically after five minutes.

Anyone remaining at the tables when the five minutes are up will receive a cash prize based on how many chips they had at the buzzer. Let’s look at an example of how this works, straight from PokerStars:

Each tournament has 240,000 chips in play (starting stacks are 5,000 chips) and a total prize pool of $ 43.20 (10 cents of the dollar buy-in is removed as the tourney fee). If a player has 12,000 chips when the time runs out, that means he has 5 percent of the chips in play. Multiply that 5 percent by $ 43.20 and you get $ 2.16, which is the prize that player will receive.

Depending on how the math works out, some prizes could be rounded down to the nearest cent, but fear not – PokerStars isn’t taking that money in an Office Space-like scheme. The rounded-off pennies will be added to the winner’s cut.

At first glance, it looks like it could be possible to just fold one’s way to a profit, or at least play extremely tight, but that will probably be quite difficult. The tables in Beat the Clock tournaments are only four handed, so blinds will come around frequently. Blind levels are also only one minute long. Add in the Zoom Poker element and everyone will be involved in hands non-stop, making it extremely hard to just try to hang on and finish out the five minutes with chips.

At the same time, these could very well smooth out variance compared to regular Zoom Poker tournaments. The bigger wins might be harder to come by, but that will be evened out by more small cashes (even if they are for less money than the buy-in), rather than straight busts.

In a press release, Severin Rasset, Director of Poker Innovation and Operations at PokerStars said, “We are constantly looking to innovate at PokerStars and believe Beat The Clock is a great new addition to our poker offering. It’s the perfect format for those who want to fit in some quick, intense poker action and is ideal for mobile play, where, in just five minutes, players can experience all the emotions and excitement that only poker provides.”

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