Posts Tagged ‘Goes’

World Poker Tour Changes Tournament Formats, Goes To “Shot Clock” For Events

 World Poker Tour Changes Tournament Formats, Goes To “Shot Clock” For Events

After experimenting with it during its closer of season event for the past two years, the World Poker Tour became the first tournament circuit to shift its tournaments to run on a “shot clock.” Furthermore, the Season XVI events will be played in an eight-handed format, a change from the nine or ten player tables of past years.

The World Poker Tour is proud to be the first to implement the Action Clock across all of its Main Tour events,” said Matt Savage, the WPT’s Executive Tour Director, during the announcement of the rule changes. “Many players, both recreational and professional, have expressed concerns that unnecessary tanking has taken a lot of the fun out of poker. Poker should always be fun, and it was a no-brainer decision to bring the Action Clock to all WPT Main Tour events following its success in the WPT Tournament of Champions and WPT500 Los Angeles. With the Action Clock, more action equals more fun, and who doesn’t want more fun in poker?”

The “Action Clock” will be sponsored by Protection Poker and it will be used at all future WPT Main Tour events. The rule will not be utilized for the entirety of the tournament, however. It will be implemented when the tournament reaches the last table before the money bubble pops and last until the end of the tournament. There are also extensive rules on the options the players will have in making their decisions.

Once the “Action Clock” is implemented, each player will be given four “time extension” chips that are of 30 second value each. The players can use those as they see fit – one at a time or all at once for a critical decision – and if they use them all, they’re gone…for a bit. When the tournament reaches three tables, the remaining players are reset to six “time extension” chips with the same rules in effect. When the six-player final table is determined, those players will receive eight “time extension” chips to go to war with.

“Protection Poker is pleased to expand its partnership with the World Poker Tour to bring the Action Clock to all WPT Main Tour events,” said Cavin Quintanilla, the Chief Executive Officer of Gaming Advancement Marketing Entertainment, LLC, the ownership behind Protection Poker. “The World Poker Tour is poker’s most player-friendly tour, and we look forward to players experiencing the ‘Action Clock’ on a global scale.”

This rule is only being applied to the players one table from the money, but another rule change being implemented by Savage could have even more of an effect on WPT events. Traditionally, the WPT starts at a nine-player table – the industry standard, for the most part – with an occasional step to a 10-player table should the tournament be bigger than normal. For Season XVI and moving forward, the WPT will be working with the casino properties that hold their events and change over to an eight-handed table.

The change to an eight-handed table versus a nine- or even ten-handed table is significant for a couple of reasons. First, the play will move around the table incrementally quicker for the players, perhaps forcing the action in places where it would normally have been more sedate. Second, the move will make for a more comfortable setting for the players, something that is more important than the public might think.

As stated by Savage, the “Action Clock” has been utilized at the WPT Tournament of Champions for its two-year history. The players in the event, former WPT champions all, have stated that its usage was excellent for those tournaments. Two-time WPT champion Daniel Negreanu has been a loud proponent of the usage of a “shot clock” in poker, saying that playing the Tournament of Champions and other “shot clock” events have spoiled him to the point that he doesn’t like playing No Limit Hold’em events without the device.

There are those who aren’t enamored with the idea, however. Some believe that having the “shot clock” will be detrimental to newcomers taking part in WPT events because of the added pressure. There is also the question of its implementation. Poker professional Ari Engel brought this point up (noting he has played in only three tournaments implementing the “shot clock”) in stating on Twitter, “Have not played many…but when I did the clock was not implemented universally fairly. Need A+ dealers for shot clock.”

No indication was given during the announcement that this is only a test period, so it appears that the “Action Clock” rule is now the norm with the WPT. Whether other circuits implement it remains to be seen.

Poker News Daily

Troy Quenneville Goes One Further, Wins partypoker $2 Million Guaranteed Event in Punta Cana

 Troy Quenneville Goes One Further, Wins partypoker $2 Million Guaranteed Event in Punta Cana

Rare is it when the World Poker Tour holds a tournament and there is another event on that calendar that actually bests it not only as far as entries but also tops it with the prize pool. That happened at the end of the week as partypoker, the sponsor for the WPT Caribbean event held in Punta Cana last week (and won by Niall Farrell over Troy Quenneville) concluded that schedule with their partypoker Millions $ 2 Million Guaranteed event.

Over two Day Ones that were conducted while the WPT event was in its Day Two and Three action, the partypoker Millions drew in 526 entries, more than what came out for play in the WPT Caribbean itself. Although such players as Farrell, Tony Dunst and Martin Jacobsen came out for the tournament, only Jacobsen was around by the last day of the event. Leading the way was Quenneville, who had used his second-place finish money from the WPT Caribbean to jump into this event as a late entry.

Quenneville had more than a 2:1 lead over the second-place competitor, Andrei-Lucian Boghean, as the other 19 players behind them jostled for position. Among those players were Erik Cajelais, Ari Engel, Matt Salsberg and Jacobsen, with both Jacobsen and Salsberg on short stacks to start the action.

Engel got healthier from the start in knocking out Sviataslau Desimon in 20th place and growing his stack over the one million chip mark. Cajelais also made some moves towards the top of the leaderboard, knocking off Dominic Smith in 12th place as Cajelais popped into third place behind Quenneville and David Yan. Once Moritz Dietrich was eliminated in ninth place by Quenneville, it was looking increasingly likely it was Quenneville’s tournament to take.

How big was Quenneville’s lead, you ask? Look for yourselves:

1. Troy Quenneville, 8.1 million
2. David Yan, 3.5 million
3. Erik Cajelais, 2.8 million
4. Ari Engel, 2.6 million
5. Andrei-Lucian Boghean, 2.3 million
6. Fabion Jergen, 2.2 million
(tie) Edward Van Klooster, 2.2 million
8. Martin Kozlov, 300,000

After the players came back from dinner, they made quick work of the final table. Kozlov went on the very first hand back, thinking his pocket Aces would stand against Quenneville’s suited J-10 only to see the board run 10-8-5-J-4 to give Quenneville Jacks up and the hand. That wasn’t enough for Quenneville as he continued his rampage over the final table, eliminating Yan when Quenneville’s Big Slick rivered a King against Yan’s pocket sevens.

Eager to get into the fight, Cajelais came to life. After seeing Engel raise the betting to 160K, Cajelais three bet to 450K but had to stop after Engel moved all in on him. The moments to ponder saw Cajelais eventually fall on the side of a call, but it was initially the wrong move. Engel was sitting on A-K, which completely dominated Cajelais’ A-10, and the 5-7-A-5 flop and turn kept Engel in the lead. The 10♠ on the river, however, flipped the script completely, giving the hand to Cajelais and eliminating Engel in sixth place.

While Cajelais stepped up, the night still belonged to Quenneville. He eliminated Jergen in fifth and, after Van Klooster took out Boghean in fourth, Quenneville had a sizeable lead over both Van Klooster and Cajelais. Once Quenneville had taken down Van Klooster in third place, he entered heads up play against Cajelais with a monstrous 8:1 lead. It would take a few hands (two of which Cajelais would double his meager holdings) but, on the final hand, Quenneville’s A-10 stood over Cajelais’ A-8 on a 9-10-9-K-2 board to give Quenneville the championship.

1. Troy Quenneville, $ 400,000
2. Erik Cajelais, $ 250,000
3. Edward Van Klooster, $ 150,000
4. Andre-Lucian Boghean, $ 90,000
5. Fabian Jergen, $ 70,275
6. Ari Engel, $ 58,000
7. David Yan, $ 46,000
8. Martin Kozlov, $ 36,000

Along with his winnings from the WPT Caribbean tournament, Quenneville in the span of two days earned $ 620,000, a nice run for sunning yourself in Punta Cana! Congratulations to Troy and all those who came back from their trip with something in their pockets.

Poker News Daily

PokerStars Goes Live in New Jersey, Initial Numbers Mixed

 PokerStars Goes Live in New Jersey, Initial Numbers Mixed

After a four-day period where the software was tested and approved by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement, PokerStars once again is alive and well on U. S. soil – or at least New Jersey soil as a part of their online gaming and poker industry.

Partnering with Resorts Casino Hotel, PokerStars prepped for their big debut today by going through a four day “soft” opening, where various pieces of the PokerStars software (which looks very much like the worldwide client) were tested for the DGE approval. Those tests were capped at 500 players and seemed to do fairly well overall, drawing in peak numbers on Saturday night at 10:50PM of 209 players and on Sunday night at 9:33PM of 304 players (figures courtesy of PokerScout.com). This led to the actions of the DGE this morning, which had been something that many New Jersey online poker players had been looking forward to.

At roughly 7AM this morning Amaya Gaming, the parent company of PokerStars, announced to that waiting audience that they were ready to go live. “We could not be more proud to bring PokerStars to New Jersey,” said David Baazov, the chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Amaya. “Working with our partner, Resorts Casino Hotel, we look forward to providing the most exciting, innovative and secure gaming experience to New Jersey.” Their partner with Resorts Casino Hotel, owner Morris Bailey, was likewise enthusiastic about the debut in saying, “This is a great day for online gaming, for state players and residents and for Atlantic City. Resorts has worked diligently to build a home for globally renowned brands in New Jersey and, with the addition of PokerStars, is proud to introduce yet another respected partner.”

As the day started, plenty of the members of Team PokerStars Pro were on hand for the grand opening. Jason Mercier piped up on Twitter, “Welcome to PokerStars New Jersey!” while showing a shot of him playing from the Resorts Casino Hotel with his dog, Marshmallow. Chris Moneymaker took some time off from his managerial duties with the Global Poker League’s Las Vegas Moneymakers to tell his followers over Twitter that, “PokerStars is back in the USA! Real money is open for play in NJ and I am on my way there!” Other Team Pro members such as Jason Somerville, Liv Boeree, Vanessa Selbst and Jennifer Shahade also sounded off about the debut.

Along with the world-class poker software that they use, PokerStars will also provide other gaming outlets for New Jersey residents. Through pokerstarsnj.com, players will take part in poker, blackjack, roulette, baccarat, and slot games. These offerings will be available to Garden City residents through home computers, laptops, tablets and mobile offerings. It also has to be emphasized that, at this time, PokerStars is only open for people INSIDE THE BORDERS OF NEW JERSEY, as many people seem to be unaware that regulated online gaming and poker is only active in three states.

So what has been the overall impact on the online poker scene in New Jersey with the addition of PokerStars? That is going to take some more time to determine, but initial looks at the numbers are not seeing a massive influx of players to the new PokerStars offering, that of Party/Borgata nor WSOP/888.

With only a few days of data to look at, the peak numbers of each of the three sites are about what would be expected. WSOP/888 had peak numbers of 376 players on Saturday and 360 players on Sunday, while Party/Borgata saw peaks of 255 and 272 (it must be noted that these peaks were prior to the peaks for PokerStars/Resorts on those same days). The overall seven day averages also aren’t greatly affected as WSOP/888 has a seven-day average of 180 cash game players (the standard of measurement by PokerScout), Party/Borgata 110 and a “suggested” average for PokerStars/Resorts of 110 also.

All of those numbers would translate out to roughly what the market was averaging previously with just WSOP/888 and Party/Borgata in the mix. These preliminary numbers would say that the apex has been reached and there isn’t further growth possible in the New Jersey market, but both PokerStars/Resorts and WSOP/888 are ramping up player promotions that might change these numbers for the better.

The true impact of PokerStars on the New Jersey online gaming and poker industry won’t really be felt for a couple of months, so let’s enjoy the honeymoon while it lasts. PokerStars is alive and well and back in the United States – at least for New Jersey residents.

Poker News Daily



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