Posts Tagged ‘Holz’

Nick Petrangelo Outlasts Mike Watson, Fedor Holz to Win Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge

 Nick Petrangelo Outlasts Mike Watson, Fedor Holz to Win Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge

In a rather rapid final table of five hours, Nick Petrangelo got his 2017 tournament poker season off to a good start by outlasting Mike Watson and Fedor Holz to win the Aussie Millions $ 100,000 Challenge on Saturday at the Crown Casino in Melbourne.

Steffen Sontheimer was the leader of the event with 451,000 in chips as it entered its final day, but that lead was a tenuous one. Hot on his heels were Holz (394,500) and Petrangelo (381,000), with the remainder of the table filled out by Sam Trickett (265,000), Watson (146,000), 2016 Player of the Year David Peters (96,000) and David Steicke (78,500) rounding out the field. With only three players getting paid, the desire to remain at the final table for even the shortest of the stacks was high.

Steicke was looking for that proverbial “double up and go home” early on and he would get that (against Sontheimer), but that would be the highlight of his day. On Hand #5 after Holz had raised and Watson three-bet the action, Steicke pushed all in from the big blind and only found Watson willing to play. Watson’s Big Slick was slightly behind Steicke’s pocket Queens, but the Ace on the flop changed everything in favor of ‘SirWatts.’ A ten on the turn presented more outs for Steicke to a Broadway straight, but the river Ace instead gave Watson trips; left with 5000 in chips, those would go to Holz on the next hand as Steicke went home empty handed in seventh place.

It would take almost two dozen more hands before the next combatant left. Watson was once again the beneficiary as, after raising from the cutoff, Peters would defend his big blind. The 7-2-10 flop brought a check-call from Peters, an action that was duplicated when a Jack came on the turn. The river brought a King and Peters checked for a third time, at which time Watson put Peters to a decision for his tournament life by moving all in. Peters mulled the decision for a lengthy time, even using a ‘time bank’ chip being employed in this tournament, before calling off his stack. Whatever Peters was thinking, he didn’t put together than Watson had rivered the nuts with his Q-9 for a King-high straight. Sending his Q-10 (pair of tens) to the muck, Peters was done in sixth place.

With two more eliminations to the money, the remaining players tightened up a bit. Trickett would double through Sontheimer to put the German on the short stack, but that would be the most action for the next 20-plus hands. On Hand 52, Sontheimer’s short stack became “no stack” when he clashed with Watson.

Sontheimer raised off the button with pocket sevens, only to see Watson three-bet out of the big blind, which Sontheimer called. A 6-8-5 flop saw Watson utilize the c-bet and Sontheimer, pondering his action, burned a ‘time bank’ chip before moving all in. Watson nearly beat Sontheimer into the center with his call, turning up pocket tens for an over pair to the board. Sontheimer, however, was in good shape with his pocket sevens; the open-ended straight draw, along with his pocket pair, gave Sontheimer 10 outs to taking the hand. Alas, another five on the turn and the Queen on the river weren’t one of those 10 outs, sending the start of day chip leader to the rail in fifth place.

Trickett would be next to head home (and without any money) as, on Hand 57, Watson’s A-J picked up a Jack on the turn to leave Trickett drawing dead with his Q-9. With a $ 1.76 million prize pool to split amongst each other, Watson (holding a significant lead), Petrangelo (rather quiet) and Holz (continuing his rush from 2016) took care of their business rather quickly.

Holz would be first to go as he decided to challenge Petrangelo. Holz correctly pushed all-in against Petrangelo (holding A-8 off suit) while holding pocket fours but, after Petrangelo called, the “poker gods” weren’t with him. An Ace showed up on the flop and a second came on the turn, leaving Holz drawing to one of the two fours to vanquish Petrangelo. The river six ended that hope and sent Holz out of the event in third place, but with some money for his efforts. Holz will look to add on to his Aussie Millions trip by playing in the Main Event final table on Sunday.

Down to heads up, Watson held a slight advantage against Petrangelo, one that he would extend to a million chips only 10 hands into play. Petrangelo spent the next 10 hands getting back to even before taking the lead on Hand 96 when he forced Watson to fold the better hand (8-6) by over betting a pot on a 5-6-3-Q-5 board when Petrangelo only held a K-7. Now roughly even, the twosome would keep action to pre-flop as three-bets took down many of the next 20 hands.

With both players playing quite strong, the ending came rather suddenly. After a raise from Watson, Petrangelo (holding a slight lead) called to see an 8-2-5 flop. Both players checked their options to see a seven come on the turn, which brought a 45K bet from Petrangelo and a call from Watson. A Jack on the river presented flush possibilities, but Petrangelo didn’t hesitate in popping 150K into the center. At this point, Watson made a move, waiting until the last possible minute to move all in. After an exact count, Petrangelo made the call and showed J-8 for two pair. All Watson could muster with his gutsy move was an A-4 for only Ace high as Petrangelo took the championship.

1. Nick Petrangelo, $ 882,000
2. Mike Watson, $ 529,200
3. Fedor Holz, $ 352,800

(all amounts in Australian dollars)

With the conclusion of the $ 100,000 Challenge, the Aussie Millions Main Event will return for its conclusion on Sunday. Shurane Vijayaram will take a big chip lead to the final table, one that will also include Holz and Jeff Rossiter amongst its notables. It promises to be an exciting day as the champion of one of the poker world’s most coveted titles – Aussie Millions Main Event champion – will be decided.

Poker News Daily

2017 Aussie Millions Main Event: Shurane Vijayaram Leads Final Table That Includes Fedor Holz

 2017 Aussie Millions Main Event: Shurane Vijayaram Leads Final Table That Includes Fedor Holz

Six days of competition have taken the Aussie Millions Main Event from its original field of 725 players all the way to the final table and the seven men who will contend for the title. On Sunday at the Crown Casino in Melbourne, Shurane Vijayaram will come back with a massive lead over a field that has Jeff Rossiter and Fedor Holz in the mix.

36 players came back to action at the start of Day 4 on Friday with Mustapha Kanit holding the lead with his 2.318 million chips and Day 2 chip leader Jennifer Tilly still quite viable on her 704,000-chip stack. Rossiter and Holz were amongst the more “known” players that also included Seth Davies and former World Poker Tour champion Brian Altman, while Vijayaram was jousting with Tilly on his 745,000 mountain of chips. Altman, unfortunately, was the player who came in on the shortest stack of all. He would depart on the very first hand, with his 54K in chips going over to Haorang Zhang when his 8♣ 7♣ was summarily crushed by Zhang’s A♣ K♣ after an unnecessary Ace on the flop and a King on the turn left him drawing dead.

The first player to make a move on the day was Rossiter, who cracked the 1.2 million chip mark when he got Matthew Wakeman to lay his hand down on a J♣ 2♠ 5♣ 9♣ flop and turn. As he was using those chips to dispatch of Ruzman Hussan, Vijayaram was starting his march. Vijayaram knocked off Steven Swalling, his flopped set of Queens holding on against the K-Q of Swalling, and soon Vijayaram joined Rossiter over the million-chip mark after eliminating Frank Pezzaniti in a classic race situation (Vijayaram’s Big Slick “only” hitting quad Aces against Pezzaniti’s pocket Jacks).

Tilly was never able to get anything going on Day 4, her chips slipping through her fingers until she doubled up through Vijayaram and STILL only had 132K in chips. The World Series of Poker bracelet holder would get her final chips in good, but it would be for naught. After calling a limp from Vijayaram off the button and Nino Marotta in the big blind checking his option, the 4-8-5-4 flop and turn saw Tilly jam after it was checked to her and only Marotta called. Tilly was in good shape to double with her J-4 against Marotta’s 6-4 off suit, but the river seven gave Marotta a straight to top the Academy Award nominee and send her home in 29th place.

A similar story could be told for Kanit who, along with Tilly, was around the top of the leaderboard for much of the tournament. He was able to get up over the three million mark when the tournament was redrawn with three tables left (18 players), but it was a gentle slide from that point onward. Gradually his pursuers drew closer and, with new chip leader Vijayaram at his table, Kanit would send a 1.6 million chunk of his stack to him when Kanit could not call a Vijayaram all in on what seemed to be an innocent 8-2-J-5 flop and turn. That hand saw Kanit’s stack fall under two million, but his next competitive hand decimated him.

After raising from the cutoff, Kanit saw Ben Heath three-bet the action off the button. After both blinds stepped aside, Kanit casually made the call and the twosome saw a Q-8-A flop. Heath c-bet his fortunes to the tune of 185K and, after some study, Kanit made the call. Both players checked the Queen on the turn and, after a King hit the river, Kanit tried to check again, but Heath was having none of it. Heath pushed all in for 1.275 million (slightly less than what Kanit held) and, agonizing over the decision, eventually would call. It was the proverbial “crying call” as Heath turned up a J-10 for the rivered straight against Kanit’s Aces up (A-10), sending Kanit to the basement with 315K in chips. After a double through Vijayaram, Kanit’s final chips would end up in the stack of David Olson as Kanit exited in 11th place.

It would take a quick 20 minutes to determine the final table. Koray Aldemir, Nicholas Wright and Peter Aristidou (oddly enough, the player who eliminated Aldemir) would depart rapidly in tenth through eighth places respectively, with Aristidou sending his stack to Vijayaram to give him a monster stack and set up the final table showdown:

1. Shurane Vijayaram, 7.47 million
2. Ben Heath, 3.27 million
3. Jeff Rossiter, 3.105 million
4. Tobias Hausen, 2.955 million
5. David Olson, 2.35 million
6. Luke Roberts, 1.305 million
7. Fedor Holz, 1.165 million

You might have noticed that Holz snuck into the final table as the short stack. Woe is the final table if he can get some chips in his hand, which is a good possibility as he is surrounded by them with the stacks of Heath (on his immediate right) and Vijayaram (on his immediate left).

The final table of the 2017 Aussie Millions will take place on Sunday as the $ 100,000 Challenge is scheduled to take the stage on Saturday. Continuing his massive heater from 2016, Holz is also a part of that tournament, so it could be a very profitable weekend for the German superstar. It promises to be an action-packed weekend of poker “Down Under” as the 2017 Aussie Millions reaches its conclusion.

Poker News Daily

2017 Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge: Germans Steffen Sontheimer, Fedor Holz Lead Final Table

 2017 Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge: Germans Steffen Sontheimer, Fedor Holz Lead Final Table

After a bit of a fitful start, the $ 100,000 Challenge got off the ground earlier this week at the 2017 Aussie Millions. On Saturday at the Crown Casino in Melbourne, the final seven men will return to action to determine a champion in the tournament.

This event was supposed to have coincided with the start of the $ 10,000 Main Event but, due to some apprehension of the players (some were in Day 1A of the Main Event and some weren’t sure they wanted to pony up that much if there weren’t going to be enough players to make it worth their while), the start date was moved to Monday to accommodate them. Additionally, Crown officials chopped the juice in half for the event, giving a bit of discount to those wanting to take part. Still, the players didn’t initially flood the tournament floor.

When the tournament kicked off only eight men were up for battle but, before the end of Level 2 (and the cutoff for the discounted juice offer), five more came to make it a two-table tournament. Once such stragglers as Sam Trickett and some re-entries (that’s right…this was an unlimited re-entry tournament), a grand total of 18 entries were taken in. The resulting prize pool of $ 1.764 million will be divvied up between the top three finishers, with the winner earning a neat $ 882,000 for their efforts (the tournament, with its low number of entries, will NOT give Player of the Year points to any calculator).

Such players as Rainer Kempe, Dan Shak, Ben Tollerene, Sam Greenwood and Mikita Badziakouski (in for two bullets) were among those that weren’t a part of the scene when the tournament closed in on the “official” final table. Once Trickett ended the day of Bryn Kenney and Alexandros Kolonias saw his tournament end at the hands of 2016 Player of the Year David Peters, the final seven men decided to call the action and come back to play for the title at a later time.

1. Steffen Sontheimer, 451,000
2. Fedor Holz, 394,500
3. Nick Petrangelo, 381,000
4. Sam Trickett, 265,000
5. Mike Watson, 146,000
6. David Peters, 96,000
7. David Steicke, 78,500

Undoubtedly all of these players are well-versed in High Roller tournaments, but you have to have some ammunition to be able to fight these wars. Thus, it will be tough for Peters or Steicke to make a run at the title. It seems that Holz is still on his heater from 2016, but the trio of Petrangelo, Trickett and Watson can’t be counted out. Sontheimer has a limited resume on the Hendon Mob database (only 14 results for a little over $ 500K in earnings), but if he’s either found the backing to play in this event or has the pockets to run with the “big dogs,” he’s got to be respected.

Because many of these players were either already in the Aussie Millions Main Event (such as Trickett) or played one of the other Day Ones in the event, the tournament was also put on hold until as late as possible – which turned out to be Saturday – to allow for these gentlemen to be able to concentrate completely on the $ 10K tournament. When they do come back to the table, the action will be a part of Jason Somerville’s live-streaming efforts on RunItUp.tv. It should be an exciting finale not only to the $ 100,000 Challenge but also to the Aussie Millions.

Poker News Daily

David Peters Stuns Fedor Holz, Takes Major Poker Player of the Year Awards

 David Peters Stuns Fedor Holz, Takes Major Poker Player of the Year Awards

After leading the two races for Poker Player of the Year pretty much since the World Series of Poker concluded in July, it was assumed that German poker superstar Fedor Holz was a lock to take down those awards come the end of December. Well, you know what they say about “assume?” Instead of reveling in the dual victories, Holz had to watch helplessly as David Peters used a late surge literally in the final tournament of the year to pass him and win both major POY races.

Peters was a good distance back of Holz on the CardPlayer Magazine Player of the Year race in mid-November, in the second-place slot by almost 1300 points. Peters would then go on a rampage that saw him win an event and finish as the runner up in the November 18-19 Aria High Roller and Super High Roller tournaments to pull within roughly 500 points of Holz. With only December left on the calendar, Peters continued storming the felt in both the States and Europe.

By finishing at the final table in two events during the running of the Bellagio’s Five Diamond World Poker Classic, Peters knocked another 250 points off Holz’s lead, but he was still short. With the POY award within his reach, Peters went to the final-ever European Poker Tour event in Prague, Czech Republic, and finished in third place for the final EPT event in history. The 1280 points he picked up for that tournament allowed him to pass Holz by a healthy margin with his 8181 points.

So where did it go bad for Holz? From the end of October on to the end of the year, Holz failed to score a single point on the CardPlayer rankings. In a normal circumstance, Holz’s 7058 points would have been more than enough to earn him the POY championship. With the advent of major tournaments going to the end of the calendar year – and the high roller tournaments that normally come along with them – it wasn’t enough in 2016 for Holz to win the CardPlayer POY.

How far from the pack were Peters and Holz? The third-place finisher, Justin Bonomo, could only muster 6020 points to finish in third place, more than 2000 points behind Peters and more than 1000 behind Holz. Two other players, fourth place Ari Engel (5653 points) and fifth place Jake Schindler (5178 points) both used big December rushes to reach their positions. Engel made a final run at the title with his final table finish at the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Rock n’ Roll Poker Open, but was unable to cash for points from his six money finishes in Prague, while Schindler made a big move with his third-place finish at the World Poker Tour’s Main Event during the Bellagio tournament series.

Rounding out the Top Ten on the CardPlayer Magazine Player of the Year rankings are Sam Soverel (4989 points, sixth place), Chance Kornuth (4838, seventh), Dan Smith (4799, eighth), Connor Drinan (4637, ninth) and Ankush Mandavia (4460, tenth).

With the more complex scoring of the Global Poker Index rankings, it was going to be tougher for Peters to pass Holz, but he would do it. His final two cashes of 2016 – his third-place finish in the EPT Prague Main Event (worth 482.16 points) and the fifth-place finish at the Five Diamond High Roller (203.68 points) – replaced two of his other top 13 finishes to push him by Holz by the closest of margins. When the final totals were put together, Peters’ 3666.31 points had managed to eclipse Holz’s 3644.8 points (remember, no cashes in the last two months of the year) and give Peters the GPI POY award.

Bonomo was once again the odd-man out in the triumvirate of players at the top, finishing in third place with his very respectable 3479.7 points. On the GPI rankings, Kornuth’s finishes got more love than on the CardPlayer board, with Kornuth hitting the fourth-place spot with 3336.54 points. Even former WSOP Europe and EPT Grand Final champion Adrian Mateos, who didn’t even show up in the Top Ten for CardPlayer, got his name in at fifth place with 3316.07 points.

Engel dropped in the rankings in the comparison between the GPI and CardPlayer Magazine, with the winner of the 2016 Aussie Millions (we’re less than a month away from the 2017 version) settling for sixth place on the GPI poll with 3290.43 points. Rounding out the next four spots are Paul Volpe (3192.88 points, seventh place), Nick Petrangelo (3176.03, eighth), Mandavia (3138.97, ninth) and Samuel Panzica (3114.66, tenth); three of those four men weren’t even mentioned on the CardPlayer Top Ten.

Although it may be the end of 2016 and the beginning of the New Year, poker professionals and amateurs alike aren’t going to be given a very long break. On January 6, the very first PokerStars Championship Bahamas (formerly the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure) will kick off, featuring a plethora of poker for those in attendance at the Atlantis Hotel. The 2017 Aussie Millions will open for play on January 11, perhaps setting up for a clash between two popular international tournaments. The WPT also gets into the mix with the start of the L. A. Poker Classic schedule on January 13 and the Borgata Winter Poker Open in Atlantic City, NJ, on January 17. Add in the various smaller tours with stops on the schedule (the WSOP Circuit, the Heartland Poker Tour, and others) and the race for 2017 Player of the Year will be off and running!

Poker News Daily

Fedor Holz with Stranglehold on Player of the Year Races

 Fedor Holz with Stranglehold on Player of the Year Races

We’re down to the final month of the tournament poker calendar (there are no major tournaments that occur following the European Poker Tour’s swan song in Prague, the Czech Republic on December 19 unless the Aria High Roller tournaments are counted) and the Player of the Year races have virtually been decided. Unless there is a drastic change atop the standings for the two major POY tabulators, Germany’s Fedor Holz will capture both awards.

Perhaps the biggest demonstration of the season that Holz has had (other than the massive increase to his bank account) is demonstrated on the CardPlayer Magazine Player of the Year race. In finishing in fourth place at an Aria Super High Roller tournament in October (a $ 100,000 buy in tournament), Holz tacked on 300 points to his already sizeable lead in the POY standings. With those 300 points, the German wunderkind has cracked the 7000-point mark (7058, to be exact) and has a nearly insurmountable lead.

Way back in second place on the CardPlayer POY is David Peters, who has been posting some great results of late but haven’t put much of a dent in Holz’s lead. In October Peters picked up some points with a fourth-place finish at an Aria High Roller tournament ($ 25,000 buy in version) and then went to Hong Kong (OK, technically Macau) and racked up over $ 850,000 in winnings and almost 700 POY points (including winning the $ 250,000 Hong Kong dollars (roughly $ 32,000 U. S.) No Limit Hold’em event at the Asia Championship of Poker). Those finishes pushed Peters up to 5791 points, still a distant scream from Holz’s total.

After leading the CardPlayer POY standings at the start of the year and then falling off the Top Ten, Ari Engel has battled back into the mix. The champion of the Aussie Millions was the runner up at the Heartland Poker Tour stop in St. Louis in November, picking up 600 valuable POY points. It wasn’t enough to hold off Peters, however, meaning Engel has to settle for the third-place slot (4969 points) at this time.

From Engel down is where the changes are most likely going to come before the calendar is flipped to 2017. Justin Bonomo (4895 points), Chance Kornuth (4838), Sam Soverel (4765), Connor Drinan (4637), 2016 World Series of Poker Championship Event runner-up Gordon Vayo (4190), Bryn Kenney, (4089) and Ivan Luca (3958) round out the CardPlayer Top 10, but they are basically battling for position (along with Engel and probably even Peters) as they most likely cannot catch Holz.

The numbers are closer together on the Global Poker Index Player of the Year standings but, because of their convoluted format, the opportunities to score points aren’t exactly there for those looking to catch Holz.

Holz has had such an outstanding season that he has only added a few points to his total. The 180.66 points that the German picked up for his finish in the Aria Super High Roller event were only about eight more points than his lowest finish previously (under the GPI rules, a player accumulates points for each of their top 13 finishes; the only way for a player’s point total to increase is to have a better point finish in an event than one you’ve already achieved). In fact, Holz has a very small window to add more points to his total; he would have to have a finish that tops that Aria score to replace it on his Top 13 finishes. Thus, Holz’s 3644.8 points is about as good as he is going to get.

Peters faces much the same problem as Holz in that he would have to start topping his previous bests to increase his point total. With 3343.09 points, the chances for Peters to make up more than 300 points are extremely slim, considering that he would have to best his lowest score (180.67 points, for his finish in a side event at the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure back in January) on at least two occasions (and by a wide margin) to even get close to Holz. It isn’t impossible for Peters to do this, but it is extremely difficult.

The rest of the GPI Top Ten are, as they were in the CardPlayer rankings, playing for positions. Kornuth (3363.54 points), Paul Volpe (3192.2), Bonomo (3127.87), Adrian Mateos (3109.86), Samuel Panzica (3046.64), Engel (3012.24), Nick Petrangelo (3008.21) and Kenney (3002.78) have plenty of maneuvering room amongst each other, but not much for moving into first and passing Holz.

Along with the final EPT event in the tour’s history and the various Aria High Roller events, the World Poker Tour will have its traditional December tournament, the Five Diamond World Poker Classic at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, wrap up their calendar year. While the WSOP Circuit, the WPTDeepstacks, the HPT and some of the other smaller circuits will hold events through December, none of them offer enough points for anyone to mount a charge against Holz. Thus, barring a stunning occurrence – and even then only on the GPI leaderboard – it appears that Fedor Holz will be poker’s Player of the Year.

Poker News Daily



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