Posts Tagged ‘Lead’

2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event Day 1B: Top Four Survivors from Day’s Action Take Overall Chip Lead

 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event Day 1B: Top Four Survivors from Day’s Action Take Overall Chip Lead

The second of two-Day Ones is in the books at the 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event, with the top four finishers from the Day 1B action taking down the overall leaderboard of the tournament because of their play.

Before the cards even went into the air on Saturday, an important milestone had been eclipsed. With 212 players in their seats (at $ 5000 a pop), the $ 3 million guarantee was met for the Main Event. This was important because the last three SHRPO Main Events had failed to meet their guarantees, with the Seminole Indian operators of the Hard Rock picking up the overlay. Before the tournament even started, the Tribe was clear of any financial dues for the tournament, something that they had to be pleased with.

As with Day 1A, top poker pros were more than willing to step back into the ring following a post-World Series of Poker slumber. Jonathan Little was one of those players, getting a big double up only four hands into the action. As Little recounted over Share My Pair, he was UTG +1 with pocket Aces and found a willing combatant in the big blind with pocket Jacks who wanted to three-bet him. After some back and forth, all the chips were in the center, with Little’s pocket Aces standing tall to give him twice his starting stack and leaving an unfortunate soul questioning how to play pocket Jacks.

By the time noon had passed, the tournament clock showed 700 entries in the tournament, with former SHRPO champion Blair Hinkle back for a second bite of the apple after not making it through Day 1A (the other three former champions – Dan Colman, Omar Zazay and defending champion Jason Koon – all made it through Day 1A). Tony Dunst, Matt Stout, former World Champion Joe McKeehen, Brian Altman, and current World Champion Scott Blumstein were also on their second chances (or fourth, depending on how you count – players could re-enter once each Day One, for a grand total of $ 20,000 (plus juice) if all four chances were used) in the tournament.

 After late registration/re-entry closed following Level 9, the players got their first look at the bounty they were playing for. An astounding 887 entries were received in the tournament, building a $ 4,301,950 prize pool for the top 111 players to divvy up. Nearly the entire final table will take home a six-figure payday (ninth place will “only” earn $ 75,413), with the eventual champion of the 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown Main Event taking home a $ 754,083 boost to the bankroll.

When the clock called for the end of Day 1B, it wasn’t surprising that the top four players from Day 1B’s action would take over the tournament leaderboard:

1. Diana Shirey, 398,900
2. Chance Kornuth, 365,000
3. David Diaz, 346,000
4. Shawn Nguyen, 345,800
5. Benjamin Ridgway, 285,900
6. Gabriel Andrade, 277,000
7. John Dubois, 234,100
8. Samuel Bernabeu, 214,700
9. Nipun Java, 213,900
10. Jorge Gomez, 211,100

When merged with the leaderboard from Day 1A, here are your overall leaders:

1. Diana Shirey, 398,900
2. Chance Kornuth, 365,000
3. David Diaz, 346,000
4. Shawn Nguyen, 345,800
5. Andy Philachack, 290,000*
6. Pablo Fernandez, 290,000*
7. Benjamin Ridgway, 285,900
8. Gabriel Andrade, 277,000
9. Lahn Pham, 270,500*
10. Alexander Turyansky, 263,300*

(* – Day 1A players)

142 players from the 480 entries made it through the Day 1B battlefield and, combined with the 127 players from Day 1A, will make for a busy Day 2 with 269 players. Plans are to play down to a final table by Tuesday, however, meaning that there will be a great deal of carnage today, not only to just get to the money bubble but also to get to a manageable number of players for action on Monday at the 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event.

Poker News Daily

2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open: Day 1A in the Books with Andy Philachack, Pablo Fernandez Holding Lead

 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open: Day 1A in the Books with Andy Philachack, Pablo Fernandez Holding Lead

The 2017 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event is underway with an invading horde of top professionals looking to battle against the best that South Florida has to offer. With Day 1A in the books, pro player Andy Philachack is joined by Pablo Fernandez in sitting atop the standings.

The $ 3 million guaranteed event had a $ 5000 buy-in and, in a departure for most tournaments today, only featured one rebuy for the day’s starters (if eliminated on Day 1A, players could come back for two more shots on Day 1B). With 30,000 in chips and 60-minute levels (and late registration/re-entry available until Level 9), many in the poker community have chosen this tournament to “get back in the game” after the summer’s work at the World Series of Poker. This was evident from the stacked tables that greeted the players.

The four men who have previously won the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event – inaugural champion Blair Hinkle, 2014 champion Dan Colman, 2015 victor Omar Zazay and defending champion Jason Koon – each held court on a singular table, taking on the field as they looked for a second chance at championship gold. Not only did the former champions of this tournament take their seats, the current World Champion, Scott Blumstein, was also on the tables for action. Add in such notables as former World Poker Tour champion Tony Sinishtaj (2017 WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown), Joe Kuether, Brian Altman, Maria Ho, Nick Schulman, Matt Stout, Ryan D’Angelo, Cate Hall, and a litany of other top pros amongst the 207 players who were there at the starting gun and the prestige of the tournament was obvious.

By the time late registration/re-entry ended after Level 9, the numbers were quite impressive. Seminole officials recorded 407 entries, with two players finishing with the exact same stack at the end of the evening. While Philachack was atop the standings for most of the day, Fernandez used a late evening double up while holding pocket Queens to sit alongside Philachack as Day 1A players take Saturday off:

1. Pablo Fernandez, 290,000
2. Andy Philachack, 290,000
3. Lahn Pham, 270,500
4. Alexander Turyansky, 263,300
5. Danny Schechter, 248,600
6. Jonathan Jaffe, 236,000
7. Oddie Dardon, 229,500
8. Nick Nieto, 226,300
9. Keven Stammen, 209,400
10. David Sands, 204,400

Add in players such as Paul Volpe (180,100 chips), John Hennigan (174,200), former World Champion Ryan Riess (159,600) and Ari Engel (145,900) and there are plenty of challenges still in contention.

Of the 407 entries on Friday, only 127 players will be ready to go with chips for Sunday. They will join up with the survivors from Day 1B of the tournament which, if it holds true for multi-Day One tournaments, should be a monstrous one. With less than $ 1 million to meeting the $ 3 million guarantee (less than 200 entries), the starting field on Saturday morning for Day 1B should eclipse the guarantee and potentially set up for a prize pool that may break the $ 6 million mark. It will be one of the things to watch for as one of the jewels of “The Big 4” – the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open final table will be contested on Tuesday as a part of “The Big 4” streaming broadcast on Twitch – continues the battle today.

Poker News Daily

2017 WSOP Championship Event Final Table, Night One: Scott Blumstein Retakes Lead as Play is Cut Short

 2017 WSOP Championship Event Final Table, Night One: Scott Blumstein Retakes Lead as Play is Cut Short

The 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event’s Night One (seems a bit odd to say that!) action is in the books and it certainly was entertaining. As the seven players (more on that in a bit) prepare to take on Night Two in a few hours, Scott Blumstein will have a monstrous lead, bigger than the one he brought to the table on Thursday night for action.

Blumstein’s 97.25 million in chips were slightly ahead of John Hesp’s 85.7 million stack, but the duo sitting beside each other didn’t look to have anyone who would challenge them. The closest competitor to the Top Two was Benjamin Pollok, whose own mountain of 35.175 million chips looked monstrous until compared to Blumstein and Hesp. Hot on Pollok’s heels was Bryan Piccioli with 33.8 million and Dan Ott was in decent shape with his 26.475 million markers. Damian Salas (22.175 million), Antoine Saout (21.75 million), Jack Sinclair (20.2 million) and a short-stacked Ben Lamb (18.5 million) rounded out those who were looking to take down the crème atop the final table.

To say that there were some fireworks to start the evening’s festivities would be a huge understatement. In fact, it wouldn’t be out of line to say that the opening salvo of hands was perhaps the most exciting in recent WSOP final table history. That the man having the most fun with his stay in Las Vegas was responsible for it would not be surprising.

Hesp came out of the gates with his guns, cannons, missiles and atom bombs of joviality and freewheeling poker decisions, entertaining the crowd in the Brasilia Room at the Rio and the millions watching at home via ESPN. On the very first hand of action, he would suck some chips out of Saout with a worse hand and, when he asked if he should show, he was egged on by the crowd (and some of his tablemates) to show the bluff right in Saout’s face. Saout’s didn’t seem pleased by the grandstanding, but it wasn’t over yet.

On the very next hand, Hesp would three-bet Ott and Ott would not be able to find the means to call. Once again egged on, Hesp showed his hand – pocket Queens (that had Ott beaten pre-flop) – that demonstrated he would make a move whether he had the goods or not. This led to the THIRD HAND of the night, in which Hesp only made a raise to get everyone out of the way. After showing his J-10 off suit as he raked in the chips, Hesp basked in the enjoyment and adulation that the entirety of the room seemed to be having and giving him.

Thus, the actions on Hand 4 of the tournament were a bit of a reality check for everyone. After Sinclair made a raise to 1.6 million off the button, Lamb decided to defend his big blind – it was only a question of how. Lamb eventually settled on moving his 18 million-chip stack to the center and an undaunted Sinclair made the call. Sinclair’s A-Q dominated the A 9 of Lamb, but the board decided it wanted to play some games. Coming down with a 6-5-4 flop, Lamb had a chance at backdoor straight and flush draws to take the hand. A turn trey eliminated the flush draws but opened some action for Lamb to a split on the open-ended straight draw.  All Lamb’s hopes were dashed, however, when a ten came on the river to eliminate him in ninth place ($ 1,000,000).

After the elimination of Lamb, a bit of seriousness seemed to settle in over the remaining eight men. Because of his early actions, Hesp had moved out to a decent lead over Blumstein, while the remainder of the field looked to catch up with them. Pollok seemed to be the best at doing this as his chip stack slowly crept up to solidify his third-place position. When there was a clash, it was between two players that probably shouldn’t have been colliding.

Normally at a final table, the two largest stacks – especially if they are in the positions that Hesp and Blumstein found themselves in – will avoid each other rather than butt heads. Thus, on Hand 47 when Blumstein opened the betting from under the gun, it was perceived that he’d get the walk about as his stack deemed. In the big blind, however, was Hesp, who called to see a flop with the only player who could hurt his stack, and the twosome saw an A-7-5 hit the felt.

Unknown to either player (but known to those watching on ESPN), a storm was brewing. Hesp had connected with his A-10 on the flop, but it was Blumenstein who was dominating with the pocket Aces he had raised with. That domination only became an evisceration when a ten hit on the turn, giving Hesp two pair but leaving him drawing dead to Blumstein’s set of Aces. That evisceration was total as, after Hesp checked his option and Blumstein bet, Hesp check-raised with his two pair. When Blumstein took no time to four-bet the action to 17 million, Hesp incorrectly moved all in and Blumstein immediately called. An innocuous trey completed the board and Blumstein rocketed back into a massive chip lead.

After Piccioli eliminated Sinclair in eighth place ($ 1.2 million), his pocket Aces ruling over Sinclair’s K♠ J♠, another 11 hands were played before a somewhat controversial decision. Roughly at 11:30PM (Pacific Time), either WSOP officials or the honchos of ESPN decided that it was time to end play for the night, short of the final six that had originally been on the schedule. Because of that decision, seven men will come back on Friday night to continue the festivities.

1. Scott Blumstein, 178.3 million
2. Benjamin Pollok, 77.525 million
3. Bryan Piccioli, 35.75 million
4. John Hesp, 22.475 million
5. Dan Ott, 16.35 million
6. Damian Salas, 15.625 million
7. Antoine Saout, 14.55 million
8. Jack Sinclair, $ 1,200,000*
9. Ben Lamb, $ 1,000,000*

(* – eliminated on Thursday night)

Play resumes this evening at 6PM (Pacific Time, 9PM Eastern Time), at which point the final seven will play down to the final three combatants. This will be the final stoppage for the 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event as, on Saturday night, a new World Champion will be crowned.

Poker News Daily

PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo Day 2: Nick Petrangelo Assumes the Chip Lead

 PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo Day 2: Nick Petrangelo Assumes the Chip Lead

The PokerStars Championship is back in action, now in sunny Monte Carlo, Monaco. I am not there, personally, so I cannot guarantee that it is sunny, but I would like to think so because whenever I see anything about Monaco on television or perhaps in a James Bond film, it is always wonderful from a weather standpoint. I suppose I could check a weather report on the internets, but that would be a waste of bandwidth. This event is called the PokerStars Championship presented by Monte-Carlo Casino, which is painfully inelegant. I much prefer the standard live tournament naming convention using the city or country rather than the casino name (and the awful “presented by”), so therefore, as you can see in the title of this article, I am siding with my colleague Earl Burton and calling it “PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo.” At any rate, after Day 2, Nick Petrangelo is the chip leader with 562,000, so congratulations to Nick for the time being.

There were two starting flights, but frankly, we are going to ignore those because they occurred when I wasn’t schedule to write and therefore for all intents and purposes* never happened. When registration closed Monday, there were a total of 727 entries for the €5,300 Main Event, creating a €3,525,950 prize pool. 143 players will make the money, but first place will get half a million Euro plus another €800. That’s nice.

Everybody playing on Tuesday has already made the money, as the money bubble burst at the very end of Day 2. Salvatore Candido Graziano had just 28,100 chips with blinds and antes at 1,500/3,000/500. Davidi Kitai made the call, showing A-K against Graziano’s pocket Queens. Race! An Ace flopped and that was it for Graziano, who went home with nothing after many hours of poker.

Odds are (ha, that’s kind of a gambling pun) most of the remaining players are sleeping fairly well Monday night, knowing that they have made the money. One might expect that there will be a bunch of quick eliminations early in Tuesday’s action as the short stacks go all Leeroy Jenkins to try to make amazing happen.

Start time is noon in Monte Carlo and the plan is to play five hour and a half levels. Stay tuned for more hard-hitting coverage!

*I was going to make a joke along the lines of Donald Trump probably thinking the phrase is “all intensive purposes,” but let’s be honest, his vocabulary isn’t advanced enough to even string those words together incorrectly.

2017 PokerStars Championship Monte-Carlo Casino Main Event – Day 2 Chip Leaders

1.    Nick Petrangelo – 562,000
2.    Michael Kolkowicz – 470,500
3.    Patrik Antonius – 452,500
4.    Faraz Jaka – 416,500
5.    Mark Teltscher – 408,000
6.    Stefan Schillhabel – 402,000
7.    Sebastian Malec – 382,500
8.    Andreas Klatt – 375,000
9.    Fabrice Soulier – 364,500
10.    Dmytro Shuvanov – 353,000

Poker News Daily

2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Day 4: Denis Timofeev Takes Lead as Final Table is Set

 2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Day 4: Denis Timofeev Takes Lead as Final Table is Set

After five days of battle at the Solis Hotel, Spa and Casino in Panama City, the final six men have been determined for the second-ever stop on the PokerStars Championship circuit in Panama. When the final table plays out on Monday, Russia’s Denis Timofeev will continue at the helm as he did on Day 4, but he’ll be sitting atop a 3.905 million chip stack for the penultimate battle.

12 men came back on Sunday with the task of setting the final table for the tournament. Timofeev, as previously stated, was in the lead with slightly more than two millino chips and there were some notable names in the pack behind him. Of particular interest was 2015 GPI Player of the Year Byron Kaverman, who was in third place with 1.236 million in chips, and the man who was the chip leader through the first two days of the tournament, Igor Yaroshevskyy. Yaroshevskyy was on the short stack with 422,000 in chips, however, and needed to make an early move to get back to viability.

It would take less than two hours for the players to eliminate three men and set the unofficial final table. Yaroshevskyy was the man who would earn that dubious honor, pushing all in after Kenneth Smaron put out a raise and Harpreet Gill made the call. Smaron immediately made the call and, after Gill sheepishly showed a A-2 as he mucked, Smaron showed Big Slick. Yaroshevskyy was beaten by a pip, holding Big Chick, but the flop had a sense of humor in coming down K-Q-3. Unfortunately for Yaroshevskyy, he couldn’t find another Queen to best Smaron and headed to the rail in tenth place ($ 27,260) and Smaron took over the lead.

Now with nine men on the redrawn unofficial final table, Timofeev and Kaverman were seated with Kaverman on Timofeev’s immediate left. Although he was out of position to a tough player, the duo didn’t tangle much. Instead, Timofeev took out his aggression on other members of the table. He forced Jonathan Abdellatif to lay a hand down and slowly saw his chip stack inch upwards. As Level 22 began in the tournament (10K/20K with a 3K ante), Timofeev was slightly behind Smaron while Kaverman was having difficulties.

Kaverman never got anything started once play reached the final table, getting his final chips in against Smaron with K-J against Smaron’s pocket treys. A monochrome 6 3 8 flop left Kaverman looking for something that would provide a split pot, but that wouldn’t come when a Queen came on the turn. Once the irrelevant river was dealt (a second Queen), Kaverman was ousted in eighth place and Smaron’s chip lead got bigger.

With one player left to the close of business for the night, play tightened up considerably until one stunning hand between Smaron and Timofeev. On a 9-2-8-4-J board and with 935,000 in the pot, Timofeev pondered his action before checking to the chip leader, normally not a recommended action. Smaron played his position, moving all in against Timofeev, who this time went deep into the tank. After a five minute reconstruction in his mind, Timofeev made the call and saw Smaron had 10-8 for a flopped middle pair. Letting off a relieved sigh, Timofeev showed a J-7 for the rivered top pair and took down the 3.29 million chip pot.

The very next hand, Timofeev stayed active in pushing a bet off the button. James Salmon three bet his stack out of the big blind and, completely unlike his hand with Smaron, Timofeev immediately made the call. His A-10 might have been on the lower end of the call spectrum, but it was the correct move as Salmon only mustered an A-2 for battle. A flopped ten all but ended the proceedings and, after a trey and a four came on the turn and river, Salmon was out in seventh and Timofeev was off to Monday’s final table with the chip lead.

1. Denis Timofeev, 3.095 million
2. Robin Wozniczek, 2.87 million
3. Kenneth Smaron, 1.855 million
4. Jonathan Abdellatif, 1.155 million
5. Harpreet Gill, 735,000
6. Anthony Diotte, 465,000

Play will resume in Panama City at noon on Monday, with the first-ever champion of the PokerStars Championship Panama taking home $ 293,860 for their efforts.

Poker News Daily



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