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2017 WPT Legends of Poker Day 4: J. C. Tran Leads Stacked Final Table That Includes Hellmuth, Rettenmaier

 2017 WPT Legends of Poker Day 4: J. C. Tran Leads Stacked Final Table That Includes Hellmuth, Rettenmaier

After 12 hours of battle, the final table of the 2017 World Poker Tour Legends of Poker Main Event has been determined. It is one of the stronger final tables in recent memory, with poker professional J. C. Tran looking to become a three-time champion on the WPT circuit as Marvin Rettenmaier looks for his third and Phil Hellmuth looks for his first.

24 players came back on Wednesday, all with the ambitions of being one of the final six who would vie for the crown. Tran was dominating the event as play began, the only player over the three million mark in chips and only Steven Tabb above two million. In looking at the last three tables, there wasn’t a weak spot anywhere; along with Tran, Hellmuth and Rettenmaier, there were such names as Oddie Dardon, Garrett Greer, David ‘ODB’ Baker, David ‘Doc’ Sands and Tuan Le arranged around the various patches of felt.

With the “Action Clock” by Protection Poker in play, the competitors had 30 seconds to make their decisions and, if there was more thought required, six “time chips” were given to the Day 4 participants to use for an additional 30 seconds each. This arrangement had been in place since one table before the bubble on Day 3 (as it will be for the remainder of the WPT Main Tour Season XVI schedule) and, for the most part, seems to have been seamlessly integrated into the WPT action.

Tran had fortune on his side early on as he four-flushed Paul Balzano to increase his lead further, while Hellmuth improved his stack to nearly one million chips in four-flushing Rettenmaier. The news wasn’t as good for Allan Le, who pushed from early position with pocket nines and ran into Mike Heshmati’s pocket Queens to eliminate Le in 24th place. Le was soon followed to the rail by Balzano, Lawrence Ma, Arkadi Onikoul, Greer and Le, Heshmati and Jason Les as the play quickly brought the field down to two tables within the first two hours of the Day 4 play.

After the redraw Tran was still at the helm of the field with 3.211 million chips, but the footsteps were drawing closer. Dardon was within roughly 300K of Tran on the leaderboard while Baker had popped over the two million mark in chips also. Hellmuth, who was responsible for eliminating Greer from the tournament, was healthy with 1.288 million in chips, but Rettenmaier was struggling to stay over the 20bb level.

At this point, Hellmuth and Rettenmaier both continued a slow grind upwards, although they would sometimes surprisingly clash with each other. On an A-K-Q-J-J board, Rettenmaier fired out a river bet that had the new host of the WPT’s “Raw Deal” segment talking to himself. As he pieced the hand together in his mind, Hellmuth commented, “Man, how did I lose this pot? I flopped Aces with the nut flush draw.” After more deliberation, Hellmuth released his hand and Rettenmaier improved the health of his stack with a roughly 350K pot.

Tran, however, wasn’t letting anyone creep any closer to him. He eliminated Igor Zektser in 15th place, Ben Nguyen in 13th place and Alex Greenblatt in tenth place to bring his stack over the six million chip mark heading to the unofficial final table. Only Adam Swan was within shouting distance and he barely had half of Tran’s stack (6.6 million to 3.320 million). Both Rettenmaier and Hellmuth were lurking with almost identical stacks (1.69 million for Rettenmaier, 1.62 million for Hellmuth) as the unofficial final table began.

With only three players to eliminate, the survivors of the 2017 WPT Legends of Poker Main Event settled in for what would turn out to be a drawn-out battle. Within the first 30 hands, both Rettenmaier and Hellmuth had improved their station in the game in reaching 3.13 million chips for Hellmuth and Rettenmaier moving up to 2.6 million. As they were improving their chances in the tournament, Tran maintained his stranglehold on the tournament in knocking off Dardon in ninth place and Jared Griener in eighth place to set the stage for the final elimination of the night.

On Hand 111 of the unofficial play at the final table, Tran opened for a raise out of the cutoff and Sands three-bet the action to 560K. Tran wasted little time in putting Sands to the test, moving all in, and Sands made the call. It was a classic race, Sands’ pocket Kings against Tran’s Big Chick (A-Q), and fortune was still sitting on Tran’s shoulder. The flop came down Q-Q-6 to give Tran trips and, instead of a cowboy coming to the rescue for Sands, the case lady hit on the river to give Tran quads and eliminate Sands on the final table bubble in seventh place.

1. J. C. Tran, 8.295 million
2. Art Papazyan, 6.005 million
3. Phil Hellmuth, 2.94 million
4. D. J. Alexander, 2.73 million
5. Adam Swan, 1.655 million
6. Marvin Rettenmaier, 1.225 million

There’s a great chance at history in this WPT final table. Should Tran or Rettenmaier win the tournament, they would join the pantheon of players – Gus Hansen, Carlos Mortensen, Anthony Zinno, David ‘Chino’ Rheem and Darren Elias – who have won three WPT titles. Hellmuth, for all the accolades he has received in his career, has NEVER won a WPT event despite making four final tables. The “fly in the ointment” could be Papazyan, who might have a slim poker resume (only seven cashes) but has a monster stack of chips at his disposal.

The final table of the 2017 WPT Legends of Poker will be the first live-streamed through the arrangement between the WPT and Poker Central over the subscription outlet PokerGO. It will begin at 4:30PM (Pacific Time) and will also be videotaped for broadcast on Fox Sports 1 later in the year. It promises to be an entertaining event as the WPT crowns their latest champion tonight at “The Bike.”

Poker News Daily

2017 World Series of Poker: Artan Dedusha Leads as Field Comes Together for Day 3

 2017 World Series of Poker: Artan Dedusha Leads as Field Comes Together for Day 3

The 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event is in full swing as, after the completion of Day 2C early this morning, Artan Dedusha will take the survivors towards the first day of action when all the competitors will be battling it out at the same time.

Dedusha started the day’s action with a decent 109,700 in chips, but it was going to be an arduous task to work through the 3300 players who came from Day 1C. Dedusha appeared to be up for the task, albeit with the assistance of some good fortune. The Brit saw some good fortune when his pocket fives flopped a set and busted an opponent’s pocket Kings, then rubbed the rabbit’s foot again when he flopped two pair against an opponent holding pocket Aces. These hands allowed Dedusha to rack up a 680,000-chip stack that not only led the Day 2C competitors but put him in the overall lead.

Dedusha’s work wasn’t the only surprise of the Day 2C action. The newlywed Merciers – Jason and Natasha – both came through the day’s carnage with a bit of a surprise. The six-months pregnant Natasha will hold bragging rights so far in the Mercier clan as she finished off Day 2C with 470,000 chips. As she was bagging those up, Jason was doing the same with his 101K in chips, an impressive feat considering he started Day 2C with just slightly more than half his tournament starting stack (28K).

Of course, with the good also comes the ugly – in poker terms, that means people being eliminated. Daniel Negreanu was one of those who had to make the long walk from the Rio tournament arenas after being eliminated on Day 2C. On what would be the hand that led to his demise, Negreanu showed an Ace after an A 3 5 flop, only to have his opponent show him merely a 6 3 for a wealth of draws but air for actuality.

Perhaps a bit steamed by that, Negreanu moved all in from early position with pocket sevens and found a dance partner in John Allan Hinds. Hinds’ pocket sixes were behind pre-flop, but four spades on the board along with Hinds’ 6♠ gave him a flush and defeated Negreanu, sending him to the rail in disappointment after an outstanding WSOP run.

Negreanu wasn’t the only one who had something to be disappointed about. Former World Champions Ryan Riess, Joe McKeehen and Phil Hellmuth hit the rail, alongside other pros such as Maria Ho, Men ‘The Master’ Nguyen, Paul Volpe, Antonio Esfandiari and Gus Hansen. And there won’t be a rematch of the “Clash of 2016,” as both William Kassouf and Griffin Benger both were eliminated and won’t be around for Day 3.

Dedusha will be the overall leader with his stack on Day 3, but here’s how he came out against his other Day 2C combatants:

1. Artan Dedusha, 680,000
2. Marcin Chmielewski, 564,000
3. Michael Krasienko, 561,300
4. Sonny Franco, 546,700
5. Ryan Hughes, 510,100
6. Tyson Mao, 506,500
7. Denis Timofeev, 498,000
8. Alexander Yen, 490,000
9. Nick Petrangelo, 480,300
10. Natasha Mercier, 476,800

This was the Top Ten from the Day 2A/B battlefield:

1. Lawrence Bayley, 618,000
2. Mickey Craft, 608,100
3. Richard Gryko, 564,800
4. Scott Anderson, 560,000
5. Sergio Castelluccio, 548,500
6. Michael Sklenicka, 540,600
7. Joseph Conor, 511,100
8. Koen Breed, 480,800
9. Grayson Ramage, 471,000
10. Larry Smalley, 469,000

And this (according to WSOP reports) would be the overall leaderboard for the tournament after the completion of Day 2 action:

1. Artan Dedusha, 680,000
2. Lawrence Bayley, 618,000
3. Mickey Craft, 608,100
4. Richard Gryko, 564,800
5. Marcin Chmielewski, 564,000
6. Michael Krasienko, 561,300
7. Scott Anderson, 560,000
8. Sergio Castelluccio, 548,500
9. Sonny Franco, 546,700
10. Michael Sklenicka, 540,600

As stated previously, the field will come together for the first time today on the Rio tournament battlefields. There are 2600 players remaining from the original 7221 runners, but it still may be a bit difficult getting to the 1084 players who will make the minimum $ 15,000 cash and earn a flag on the Hendon Mob board late Thursday night/early Friday morning. There’s still quite a bit of work to be done before we begin speaking about the true contenders for the 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event bracelet and the crown of World Champion, but that time is coming closer.

Poker News Daily

PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo: Bryn Kenney Leads Super High Roller, Main Event Begins Saturday

 PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo: Bryn Kenney Leads Super High Roller, Main Event Begins Saturday

The sun has set on the beautiful Mediterranean coastline of Monte Carlo for another evening and, with the coming of night, another day is in the books for the PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo. In the 100,000 Euro Super High Roller, Bryn Kenney heads the list of the final nine players while the remainder of those in Monaco for business prepare for the start of the Main Event on Saturday.

With 38 players remaining at the start of the day, four more entries were received to bring the final numbers of the Super High Roller to 61 total entries. The four players – Alexander Uskov, Nick Petrangelo, Leon Tsoukernik and Dietrich Fast – had all busted out previously on Thursday, but they took advantage of the re-entry option to dive back in on Friday (and keep the number of singular entries to 47). Even with another 300K in chips to go to battle with, none of the re-entries from the start of action on Friday would be around by mid-afternoon.

Most of the eyes in the Monte Carlo Casino’s poker room were glued to actor/comedian Kevin Hart at the start of action. Hart, who participated in the first-ever PokerStars Championship offering in the Bahamas and made Day Two of the Super High Roller, was in much better shape as he started the Monte Carlo Day Two. Alas, Hart was unable to make his 396,000 do any work for him as he demonstrated a bit of amateur play on the hand that broke him.

After limping into the pot, Hart saw Byron Kaverman move all in and called off the remainder of his stack. Hart was in the lead with his pocket sevens over Kaverman’s A-4, but “conventional play” would have dictated that Hart would have pushed with his middle pair rather than call off his chips. Regardless, Hart was all in and at risk as Kaverman was rewarded with two Aces on the flop to take the lead. Hart struck back, however, when a seven came on the turn to magically thrust him back in front with a boat. Just as quickly, a four came on the river to give Kaverman the most unlikely of full houses, Aces over fours, to top Hart’s turned full house and send the star of Central Intelligence back to the set with no payday.

Although tournament officials would have liked to have seen the money bubble pop (eight players taking home some cash), they would have to settle for coming up just short. Nine players will come back on Saturday to first determine who will get paid (it isn’t looking good for David Peters, on the short stack with 800K in chips) and then who will walk off with the top prize of 1,784,500 Euros. As it looks right now, Kenney is in the catbird’s seat for that potential payoff.

1. Bryn Kenney, 3.37 million
2. Viacheslav Buldygin, 2.975 million
3. Steffen Sontheimer, 1.91 million
4. Martin Kabrhel, 1.63 million
5. Isaac Haxton, 1.26 million
6. Ole Schemion, 1.25 million
7. Sam Greenwood, 1.15 million
8. Daniel Dvoress, 950,000
9. David Peters, 800,000

To say that Kenney has made a living off High Roller tournaments might be the understatement of 2017 (and we’re not even halfway through the year). Of his 16 cashes in tournament poker this year, 12 of them have come in tournaments with a buy-in higher than $ 25,000 and six have been in the Aria High Roller series. Eight of those cashes have been for six figures, with the highest being Kenney’s win at the PSC Bahamas $ 50,000 High Roller (just under a million at $ 969,075).

When the tournament restarts on Saturday, one man is going to be pissed because he will receive nothing for three days of work. The remainder of the final table will receive six-figure paydays and the champion walks off with 1.7 million-plus Euros, not a bad way to start the Monte Carlo leg of the PokerStars Championships.

While these nine men do their work tomorrow, the first day of the Main Event will open for action. The 5000-Euro tournament, when it was under the auspices of the European Poker Tour, marked the end of the European tournament season and awarded the Grand Final trophy to its victor. Now, the Monte Carlo stop is simply another leg in a tournament poker season, so expecting it to bring in the 1098 entries that came out for the 2016 version might be asking too much.

PokerStars officials are expecting better attendance than the last two PSC events in Panama (366 entries) and Macau (536), but it will push the envelope to reach the 738 entries of the PSC Bahamas. At noon local time (6AM East Coast), we’ll get our first indications of just how big the PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo might be.

Poker News Daily

Bryn Kenney Rockets to POY Leads, Demonstrates Problems With Systems

 Bryn Kenney Rockets to POY Leads, Demonstrates Problems With Systems

We’ve blown by the quarter pole in the various races for poker’s Player of the Year, but both of the major standings are in agreement. As players prepare for the 2017 World Series of Poker (only about six weeks away, everyone!), Bryn Kenney has been able to pull out to the lead in the various POY races. Kenney’s lead also demonstrates that there are some problems with both the POY systems and their methods of awarding points.

On the CardPlayer leaderboard, Kenney has 3106 points, as astronomical amount for this point in the year (also astronomical? The $ 2.9 million plus he’s already put in the bank for 2017). In looking at Kenney’s performance, however, he has garnered the majority of his points through the “High Roller” tournaments that are being held, especially at Aria in Las Vegas. Kenney got off to a nice start, cashing six times at the PokerStars Championship Bahamas (including winning the $ 50,000 Super High Roller, the $ 25,000 High Roller and finishing seventh in a $ 100,000 Super High Roller that wasn’t originally part of the schedule) to rack up 1266 points. Of his other seven point-earning tournaments (that have earned Kenney 1840 points), five of them have been at the Aria High Roller series and the other two were both tournaments with a buy in over $ 25K.

This disparity displays the problems with both the CardPlayer system and, as we will see momentarily, the Global Poker Index’s tabulations. In his most recent finish at Aria, the $ 25K tournament was a total of 30 people that earned Kenney 350 POY points (CardPlayer); in winning the World Poker Tour Tournament of Champions, Ryan Riess had to go through a field more than ten times that size to earn his 1200 points for his victory (his only point-earning tournament for 2017). The question has to be asked:  should a player, going through a much smaller field with a big buy-in, earn more points (relatively) than a player who goes through a bigger field with a smaller buy-in?

While Kenney has been able to take the lead to this point in the CardPlayer POY, there are a couple of players on his heels. Ben Heath, the runner-up at the Aussie Millions, has had a blistering start to 2017. He won a $ 15K event at the PokerStars Championship Bahamas and picked up some more points at the WPT L. A. Poker Classic and another runner-up finish at $ 1500 Wynn Classic Main Event. All totaled, Heath has accumulated 2976 points to only be 130 points back of Kenney.

Nick Petrangelo is also back in the swing after finishing eighth in the GPI POY in 2016. On the CardPlayer boards Petrangelo, who won the $ 100,000 PokerStars Championship Bahamas event, also earned points during the Aussie Millions and the PokerStars Championship Macau. Once you total up his six points-earning finishes, Petrangelo is in third place on the CardPlayer table, holding 2918 points.

It’s a bit of a jump down to the other seven men who make up the Top Ten on the CardPlayer rankings. Anthony Spinella (2360 points) and Aussie Millions champion Shurane Vijayaram (2280) are in fourth and fifth places, respectively. Dan Colman (2266 points), Simeon Naydenov (2230), Sam Panzica (2174), Daniel Strelitz (2100) and Darryll Fish (2076) round out the remainder of the CardPlayer Top Ten.

On the Global Poker Index Player of the Year ratings, the same man is sitting at the top. Kenney, who has seen a couple of his Aria performances dropped because they haven’t met the requirements of the GPI for inclusion on their rankings, still racks up 2487.7 points and has a pretty decent lead over his closest competitor. Ari Engel has been able to accumulate points across a wide spectrum of tournaments (his most recent point-earning event was winning the Mid-States Poker Tour Milwaukee Main Event championship for a six-figure score) to land in second with 2032.65 points.

Our first deviation in the charts comes with Mustapha Kanit in third place. While he did pick up a sizeable chunk of points in the Bahamas (891-plus points), Kanit also used finishes in the Aussie Millions and the PokerStars Championship arenas Panama and Macau to total 1970.27 points. Keeping the deviation going, Sergio Aido (1933.22 points), Byron Kaverman (1828.69) and Manig Loeser (1752.38) all reflect a deviation from the CardPlayer charts in coming in on the GPI ratings in fourth through sixth, respectively.

Petrangelo, while ranked much higher on the CardPlayer boards, also lands on the GPI countdown in seventh place  with 1642.51 points. Koray Aldemir (1631.78), Dylan Wilkerson (1562.14) and Spinella (1502.72) round out the GPI Top Ten. If you look to break it down, that means that, between the 20 slots available on the CardPlayer and GPI rankings, 17 men can claim to be in the Top Ten in tournament poker at this time.

Needless to say, this is going to be a free-flowing chart. The World Poker Tour’s Season XVI schedule will begin on Friday in Beijing, followed by the WPT Amsterdam beginning May 5. The World Series of Poker Circuit has a couple more events and, by the end of May, the 48th Annual World Series of Poker begins itself in Las Vegas. If the major ranking organizations continue to count the small-field High Roller events, however, Brynn Kenney will be tough to catch as he gets a huge percentage of his points from those events.

Poker News Daily

Daniel Weinman Leads Final Table for Monster WPT Tournament of Champions

 Daniel Weinman Leads Final Table for Monster WPT Tournament of Champions

After two days of battle through 66 of the greatest champions the World Poker Tour has seen, the final table has been set in the Monster WPT Tournament of Champions at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Hollywood, FL. Making the most out of his championship won at the Borgata in January during the Season XV schedule, Daniel Weinman will sit atop the standings when action resumes on Sunday, but several dangerous WPT Champions’ Club members – including a Poker Hall of Famer and one who may join that illustrious group – are looking to take him down.

When the tournament resumed on Saturday, 30 players remained from the 66 who started the event the previous day (an improvement of two players versus the inaugural run of the tournament in 2016). The always-dangerous Michael Mizrachi, who is building a resume that could be Hall of Fame worthy, was atop the standings at the beginning of the day’s play with 287,600 in chips. The hometown hero was joined by another popular Florida pro, James Romero (276,000), in leading the pack. Arranged behind the twosome in the Top Five were Griffin Paul (214,300), Tyler Patterson (199,300) and Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel (179,200).

To start the day, the defending champion of the event was bounced. Inaugural ToC victor Farid Yachou, who came into Day 2 on an extremely short stack, made an opening raise only to see Dylan Wilkerson try to bully him out of the pot with a three-bet. Yachou wasn’t going anywhere, however, making the call and revealing a pocket pair of fours for the race against Wilkerson’s Big Slick. The Q-J-9 flop wasn’t a good one for Yachou and, when a ten came on the turn, it was all over for the former champion. After a King on the river cruelly gave Yachou the second best straight on the board (Wilkerson’s Ace made him Broadway), the former champion headed to the rail to see who would be the next to hold the crown.

With only the final nine players receiving a payday from the tournament, the players actively tried to chip up to be in position for one of those slots. Mizrachi looked to continue his dominance in the event by knocking out two-time WPT champion (in Season XV alone) Sam Panzica, while Wilkerson continued his march up the leaderboard in cutting some chips from Romero when Wilkerson’s pocket Kings stood tall over Romero’s pocket Queens in a cooler. Once Marvin Rettenmaier was bumped off by Zachary Smiley in 25th place, the final three tables were set for the tournament.

The action didn’t let up at this point but increased as players looked to take on Mizrachi and Wilkerson. Stefan Schillhabel emerged as a potential contender, eliminating Scott Seiver from the festivities while climbing to 240,000 in chips, as did Paul, who quietly kept his name in the mix even while sitting to Mizrachi’s right. It wasn’t until mid-afternoon that a big hand occurred that would influence the final table.

After Seidel raised out of the cutoff, Romero three bet the action out of the big blind back to the eight-time WSOP bracelet winner. Seidel four-bet Romero (that should have warned James there) and, after Romero used a Time Bank chip (the tournament was played with a 30-second “shot clock” and players had five Time Bank chips that gave them an additional minute each to ponder complex hands), Romero decided to put his tournament life on the line. With just a few more chips than Romero, Seidel made the call and the table saw what the “big dogs” were betting.

Seidel’s hand was potentially predictable – A♣ K♣ – but Romero’s was a bit surprising. Instead of a middle pair or even a big Ace, Romero only mustered an A-9 off suit for the battle. Once the A-K-Q flop rolled, Romero was looking to draw to a Broadway straight just to be able to split the pot barring runner-runner nines. Once a deuce hit the turn, Romero was drawing dead (and hit the rail on the next hand) as Seidel thrust his name into contention for the ToC championship.

The players that walked out of the Hard Rock with nothing to show for their two days at the ToC read like a Who’s Who of poker. Former World Champion Ryan Riess (who won his way into the ToC by taking down the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale on Thursday), Anthony Zinno, James Mackey (running Big Slick into Daniel Santoro’s pocket Aces) and Paul were some of the victims caught in the minefield of elimination. It was also the time Weinman began his move to the top.

On two consecutive hands, Weinman would use the ladies to his advantage. All in against Wilkerson’s pocket nines, Weinman’s pocket Queens would hold strong to double up, then he would pull the trick a second time in clashing with Mizrachi’s pocket nines when, holding Big Chick (A-Q) he hit another lady in the window to top him. Those two hands catapulted him to 315,000 in chips and he would utilize those to surge into the lead.

It would be another hand with Mizrachi that put Weinman in the lead for the night. On a K-8-6-J-6 board, Mizrachi put out a bet that send Weinman into the tank. Using two Time Bank chips, eventually Weinman found the call in him and, after a tap of the table from Mizrachi that he had been bluffing, Weinman officially showed a K-Q for Kings up to take a pot that pushed him to 585,000.

Once Jonathan Little was eliminated by David Ormsby, the final 10 men looked to determine who would be the last unfortunate to not receive any of the prize pool. It would be Mizrachi who would bring the tournament into the money when he rivered a nut flush against Lee Markholdt’s pocket eights to eliminate Markholdt in tenth place ($ 0) and move to the nine handed unofficial final table as the chip leader with 705K in chips.

After the redraw was complete, the battle for the official WPT six-handed final table began. Mizrachi stayed active, doubling up Wilkerson, before knocking off Jonathan Jaffe in ninth place. Weinman, however, was up to the task as he moved into the lead after cutting a stack of chips from Santoro to crack the 800K mark. Seidel would eliminate Jesse Sylvia in eighth place over the course of two hands and, after another dozen hands of play, Wilkerson would end the action for the day by taking down Schillhabel in seventh place to set the final table for the WPT Tournament of Champions.

1. Daniel Weinman, 872,000
2. Michael Mizrachi, 699,000
3. Dylan Wilkerson, 641,000
4. Erik Seidel, 540,000
5. David Ormsby, 299,000
6. Daniel Santoro, 250,000

There is still plenty of time for one of these six men to catch fire and move on the leaderboard. Even the short stacks of Ormsby and Santoro (30 and 25 big blinds, each) have some working room to look for the right hand to double on, making this afternoon’s action one that shouldn’t be missed. The final table will be live streamed at WPT.com beginning at 4:30PM (a 30-minute delay) and will also be taped for the broadcast of the WPT on Fox Sports 1. All six men are guaranteed a $ 57,225 return on their $ 15,000 investment, with the eventual champion walking off with $ 381,500 and a boatload of other prizes (including a 2018 Audi S5) for their work.

Poker News Daily



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