Posts Tagged ‘Open’

Patrik Antonius Wants to Open Poker Room in Monaco

 Patrik Antonius Wants to Open Poker Room in Monaco

Patrik Antonius was one of the kings of poker before Black Friday. He was a successful player before poker exploded, but it was the poker boom that really helped him rise to fame, as it did with many poker players. One of the most prolific online players of all time, his success at nose bleed stakes plus stunning good looks (and I mean that when judging on a regular attractiveness scale, not just a poker player attractiveness scale) propelled him to superstar status.

His former online poker home, Full Tilt, gone and online games tougher than ever, Patrik Antonius isn’t as active in poker as he used to be, but he is still playing and having a good time. Now living in Monaco, he is currently competing in the PokerStars Championship sponsored by Monte-Carlo Casino. It is there that PokerNews found him and asked him how things were going.

“I’ve been very good,” Antonius told PokerNews. “I’m very happy with my life situation, I can’t complain. You know, I haven’t been traveling for the events. Life changes a little bit and my lifestyle has changed as well.”

“I’ve been here in Monaco with my family, my kids are growing and I don’t really want to be months and months away from home anymore,” he added. “I wished we would have more, bigger and regular games in Europe.”

Hey, makes sense. While there are certainly places to play poker in Europe, Antonius prefers cash games and the best ones are in Las Vegas and Macau, neither of which is ever arguably convenient to Monaco. And while there are a bunch of major tourneys every year in Europe, the United States is still where it’s at.

“I can’t say that I’m a very experienced tournament player anymore,” Antonius told PokerNews. “I was playing a lot of tournaments in 2005 and 2006, but for the last eight years or so, I’ve played fewer than 10 tournaments a year.”

So, since finding a good game locally is a problem and Antonius isn’t very keen on traveling to hell and gone for one, he is doing something about it. Antonius is working on creating his own land-based poker room right there in Monaco.

“I can’t share any details yet but if we could get a nice poker room in Europe, that would be good for a lot of people,” he said.

Oh, but he did share some details. Antonius believes that Monaco could support a poker room because he knows of enough poker players who are interested in playing “decently high stakes” cash games and who would also be happy to make a short trip to Monaco, rather than, say, Las Vegas or Macau.

“People would fly here from all over the world. It would be very easy to organize good games here. We just have to get proper rake so it’s reasonable.”

Poker News Daily

Pete Yanhan Chen Wins WPT Beijing to Open WPT Season XVI

 Pete Yanhan Chen Wins WPT Beijing to Open WPT Season XVI

Well, we kind of knew this was going to happen going into the final table of the first event of the World Poker Tour (WPT) Season XVI, but Pete Yanhan Chen made it official Wednesday, winning WPT Beijing. Chen entered the six-handed final table with a prohibitive chip lead, holding more chips than his five opponents combined.

Chen’s lead was never really in doubt the entire final table. He wielded his chip stack like Reinhardt’s hammer in Overwatch, keeping everyone at bay while he chipped up.

The one time it looked like maybe, possibly, Chen could be at risk of coming back to the pack was with four players remaining. According to WPT.com, he raised all-in pre-flop under the gun and Zhang Wenbin called all-in for around a million chips. Zhang had Chen dominated with K-J against K-7 and it held up, allowing him to double-up to 2.2 million. Chen still had 7.4 million, so it wasn’t a big deal.

The very next hand, the 79th of the final table, Zhang raised to 195,000 pre-flop and Chen again shoved, putting Zhang all-in. Zhang called with pocket Queens, way ahead of Chen’s K-J. If Zhang doubled-up on this hand, he would be well within striking distance of Chen. That didn’t happen, though, as Chen flopped a King to give him a better pair and then rivered another King for good measure. Zhang was out of the tournament in fourth place and Chen got his chips back from the previous hand, growing his stack to 9.715 million.

Shortly thereafter, Lu Yingqi was knocked out in third place, setting up the heads-up match between Chen Yanhan and Chen Ke. Yanhan (we’re switching naming conventions now since they are both Chens), of course, had a huge lead, 9.99 million to 2.01 million. Ke held on as long as he could, but it was no contest.

Finally, on Hand #111 of the final table, Ke moved all-in for just over a million chips and Yanhan made the easy call, holding K-4 of spades. Ke was behind with Q-3, but at least had two live cards, which is about all you can ask for in that situation. None of the community cards helped either player, meaning Yanhan won the hand, the pot, and the tournament.

With a first prize worth about USD $ 300,000, Pete Yanhan Chen has now won over $ 1 million in his live tournament career. He has dozens of small cashes dating back to 2011, the vast majority of which are from tournaments in Asia. His largest cash before this won came back in 2014, when he finished fifth place in the Asia Pacific Poker Tour Macau Main Event for $ 74,170.

2017 World Poker Tour Beijing Main Event – Final Table Results

1.    Pete Yanhan Chen – CNY 2,063,454 (USD $ 299,485)
2.    Chen Ke – CNY 1,373,026 (USD $ 199,278)
3.    Lu Yingqi – CNY 882,619 (USD $ 128,101)
4.    Zhang Wenben – CNY 585,468 (USD $ 84,974)
5.    Tan Yancheng – CNY 450,616 (USD $ 65,401)
6.    Bryan Huang – CNY 373,218 (USD $ 54,168)

Poker News Daily

Pete Yanhan Chen Wins WPT Beijing to Open WPT Season XVI

 Pete Yanhan Chen Wins WPT Beijing to Open WPT Season XVI

Well, we kind of knew this was going to happen going into the final table of the first event of the World Poker Tour (WPT) Season XVI, but Pete Yanhan Chen made it official Wednesday, winning WPT Beijing. Chen entered the six-handed final table with a prohibitive chip lead, holding more chips than his five opponents combined.

Chen’s lead was never really in doubt the entire final table. He wielded his chip stack like Reinhardt’s hammer in Overwatch, keeping everyone at bay while he chipped up.

The one time it looked like maybe, possibly, Chen could be at risk of coming back to the pack was with four players remaining. According to WPT.com, he raised all-in pre-flop under the gun and Zhang Wenbin called all-in for around a million chips. Zhang had Chen dominated with K-J against K-7 and it held up, allowing him to double-up to 2.2 million. Chen still had 7.4 million, so it wasn’t a big deal.

The very next hand, the 79th of the final table, Zhang raised to 195,000 pre-flop and Chen again shoved, putting Zhang all-in. Zhang called with pocket Queens, way ahead of Chen’s K-J. If Zhang doubled-up on this hand, he would be well within striking distance of Chen. That didn’t happen, though, as Chen flopped a King to give him a better pair and then rivered another King for good measure. Zhang was out of the tournament in fourth place and Chen got his chips back from the previous hand, growing his stack to 9.715 million.

Shortly thereafter, Lu Yingqi was knocked out in third place, setting up the heads-up match between Chen Yanhan and Chen Ke. Yanhan (we’re switching naming conventions now since they are both Chens), of course, had a huge lead, 9.99 million to 2.01 million. Ke held on as long as he could, but it was no contest.

Finally, on Hand #111 of the final table, Ke moved all-in for just over a million chips and Yanhan made the easy call, holding K-4 of spades. Ke was behind with Q-3, but at least had two live cards, which is about all you can ask for in that situation. None of the community cards helped either player, meaning Yanhan won the hand, the pot, and the tournament.

With a first prize worth about USD $ 300,000, Pete Yanhan Chen has now won over $ 1 million in his live tournament career. He has dozens of small cashes dating back to 2011, the vast majority of which are from tournaments in Asia. His largest cash before this won came back in 2014, when he finished fifth place in the Asia Pacific Poker Tour Macau Main Event for $ 74,170.

2017 World Poker Tour Beijing Main Event – Final Table Results

1.    Pete Yanhan Chen – CNY 2,063,454 (USD $ 299,485)
2.    Chen Ke – CNY 1,373,026 (USD $ 199,278)
3.    Lu Yingqi – CNY 882,619 (USD $ 128,101)
4.    Zhang Wenben – CNY 585,468 (USD $ 84,974)
5.    Tan Yancheng – CNY 450,616 (USD $ 65,401)
6.    Bryan Huang – CNY 373,218 (USD $ 54,168)

Poker News Daily

Daniel Weinman Earns Big Birthday Cake Candle, Wins WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open

 Daniel Weinman Earns Big Birthday Cake Candle, Wins WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open

On his 29th birthday, Daniel Weinman came from the bottom half of the final table to eventually take a dominant lead and cruise to victory at the World Poker Tour’s Borgata Winter Poker Open on Friday evening.

Weinman was sitting in fourth place at the start of action on Friday, but there were three difficult competitors ahead of him. Atop the standings was Nathan Bjerno, who had rocketed out to a sizeable lead with his 12.415 million chips. Jia Liu (6.815 million) and Tyler Kenney (the only player with a WPT final table under his belt, with 6.03 million) were within sight of Weinman, but he had Richard Foster (5.13 million) contesting him for the fourth-place slot. Nicholas Immekus seemingly was on the short stack (3.55 million) but, in the right situation, Immekus had a stack big enough to be a concern.

With very deep stacks, it was thought that the players would come out slowly (not to mention the $ 892,433 in first place money at stake). Instead, the men came out like they had a plane to catch. On Hand #10 Kenney, who was very active early at the final table, popped the betting to 200K, only to see Immekus make it 700K to go from the big blind. After a moment’s pause, Kenney four-bet Immekus and he responded with an all-in. Kenney immediately made the call this time, turning up pocket Queens to run against Immekus’ Big Slick. The 7-5-2 flop didn’t hit Immekus and, after a Queen hit the turn, he was drawing dead (the meaningless river card was a ten) and hit the rail in sixth place.

Kenney, now the chip leader over Bjerno, kept the table at bay as they jousted with three and four bets pre-flop, which became the norm. Weinman, on Hand #26, made his move up the leaderboard in defeating Foster in what would be a huge cooler for Foster. Under the gun, Weinman min-raised and Foster confidently defended his big blind with a three bet. A suspicious (but cagey, as it would prove) Weinman thought over his situation for a couple of moments before simply calling Foster’s bet. On the J-J-5 flop, Foster fired all in and there was no hesitation from Foster; he hammered in the call, turning up pocket Aces against Foster’s pocket Kings, and there was no salvation for Foster. In fact, the Ace on the river added insult to injury in sending Foster to the rail in fifth place as the level ended.

With the blinds and antes now at 60K/120K and 20K, Liu was now feeling the pain of the rapid rounds (Kenney, Weinman and Bjerno were all over 10 million in chips) and had to make a move. He found that chance on Hand #32 when, after a Kenney raise, Liu looked him up from under the gun. A highly-coordinated J♥ 10♣ 9♣ flop came and Liu would check call a bet from Kenney. A 3♣ completed any flush draw, which is what Liu represented when he check-raised all in Kenney’s 770K bet on the turn. Kenney, after reviewing the hand in his mind, came up with the call and turned over pocket Queens with the club. Liu wasn’t dead in the hand with his Q-9 off suit to have the same straight draw as Kenney but an inferior pair. A nonconsequential 4♠ on the river didn’t help anyone, keeping Kenney in the lead and with the chips as Liu exited in fourth place.

The three men remaining – Kenney (16.555 million), Weinman (12.24 million) and Bjerno (10.555 million) – would then slow down the action tremendously. Over the next 30-plus hands, it seemed as if Kenney and Weinman would take turns pounding on Bjerno as his stack went down while theirs headed up. The bounty was good enough that Kenney didn’t seem to mind when Weinman passed him for the lead, but it would become a factor in what would be the penultimate hand of the tournament.

On Hand #65, Kenney raised the button only to have Weinman three bet the action from the big blind. Kenney called to see an 8-5-4 rainbow flop. Weinman check-called a 1.4 million bet from Kenney and, after a ten on the turn, would do the same to a three million bet from Kenney. A river trey saw Weinman check for a third time and Kenney would move all in for more than ten million chips. Only covering Kenney by about a million, Weinman agonized over the decision before finding the call, which turned out to be the correct one. Weinman could only muster a 9-5 off suit for second worst pair on the board, but it was enough; Kenney had been pushing the bluff from the start as his K-9 was only good for King-high. Once it was confirmed that it was Kenney who was all in, the mountainous pile of chips headed to Weinman as Kenney headed out the doors of the Borgata in third place.

With such a monstrous lead, it was thought Weinman (33.805 million chips) would make short work of Bjerno (5.545 million). Bjerno would prove to be a worthy adversary, however, dueling with Weinman for 50 hands but never drawing any closer than a 3:1 disadvantage. On the final hand, Weinman would move all in and Bjerno, in need of a double, called with an A-4. Normally in heads up Bjerno’s hand would have been a good fighter, but Weinman’s A-5 had him outpipped and behind from the start. The A-8-6 flop made a chop more of a chance and the seven on the turn eliminated Bjerno from winning the hand outright as a four on the river would give Weinman a straight. Sure enough, that four fell on the river to give Bjerno an unfortunate pair while giving Weinman the eight-high straight to win the hand and the 2017 WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open Main Event.

1. Daniel Weinman, $ 892,433
2. Nathan Bjerno, $ 524,964
3. Tyler Kenney, $ 327,578
4. Jia Liu, $ 275,081
5. Richard Foster, $ 228,787
6. Nicholas Immekus, $ 184,787

Poker News Daily

2017 Borgata Winter Poker Open Day 4: Final Table Determined, Nathan Bjerno Massive Chip Leader

 2017 Borgata Winter Poker Open Day 4: Final Table Determined, Nathan Bjerno Massive Chip Leader

The final table for the World Poker Tour’s 2017 Borgata Winter Poker Open in Atlantic City, NJ, is shaping up to be a “one versus all” affair. The reason? Chip leader Nathan Bjerno, who garnered most of his chips in taking down two of the players who had been around the top of the leaderboard virtually the entire tournament, has almost a third of the chips in play.

34 players returned to the baize at the Borgata on Thursday with the difficult task of getting to the final six. Charles Coates held the lead with his 3.371 million in chips, but right behind him was Blake Bohn and his 3.024 million stack. With both players on the same table, the potential for fireworks was in the mix, but it would take some time for the fuse to be lit.

There was still a bit of play in the stacks (even short stacked Asher Conniff was sitting decently with his 406,000 in chips, good for 17 big blinds), so it took a bit of time before the first elimination of the day. That occurred when Day 2 chip leader Jack Duong pushed his stack all in against Shaun Deeb about 40 minutes into the day. Deeb was more than happy to call Duong’s push with his pocket Kings and Duong, with Big Slick, would hit on the K-J-10 flop for a gut shot straight draw. Unfortunately, Duong couldn’t find the filler for the hole in his straight – the Queen – on the turn or the river, sending him out of the tournament 34th place.

The next competitor out surprised many in the tournament room. Coming in with an even million chips, Olivier Busquet would send more than half of them to Bart Dowling after Dowling turned a set and rivered quad sixes against him. That wasn’t the most painful beat, however, as moments later Busquet would take on Bohn in the hand that would end his tournament.

After Bohn raised and Dowling called, Busquet would squeeze the action with an all-in move. Bohn looked him up (Dowling exited at this point) and the players turned their cards up. It was the classic race situation, Busquet’s A-10 off suit versus Bohn’s pocket eights. In the window was an Ace for Busquet, but the third card on the flop was an eight to give Bohn a set. Once an innocent trey and a four came on the turn and river, Busquet was suddenly out of the tournament in 33rd place.

Bohn was quite aggressive with those new chips and it paid off well for him. He would eliminate David Stefanski in 28th place and forced Adnan Mohammad to lay down another hand as his chip stack climbed to almost five million chips. After Tony Ruberto bluffed off a stack of chips to him, Bohn was in prime shape for the final table as his stack reached the 6.5 million mark.

That would be the epitome of Bohn’s day, however. He would bleed chips off over the course of the evening but reach the unofficial final table with about half the chips he had after Ruberto’s bluff. Those chips would hit the center against Bjerno, who had stormed out to a decent lead over the field by earlier knocking off Coates in tenth place with his pocket threes flopping a set against Coates’ pocket sixes. Bohn was in a different situation, however, as his A-K would need help against Bjerno’s pocket tens. It wouldn’t come as the board came down ten-high, giving Bjerno an unnecessary set against Bohn’s Ace-high and sending Bohn to the rail in eighth place.

After Jia Liu took down Thomas Penza in seventh place – Liu’s pocket Jacks handling Penza’s A♥ 8♥ with ease on a K-5-3-5-Q board – the official WPT final table was set with Bjerno over the 12 million mark in chips:

1. Nathan Bjerno, 12.415 million
2. Jia Liu, 6.815 million
3. Tyler Kenney, 6.03 million
4. Daniel Weinman, 5.41 million
5. Richard Foster, 5.13 million
6. Nicholas Immekus, 3.55 million

For those who plan to be in attendance for the final table action, it may be a long evening. Immekus, on the short stack, still has 44 big blinds to play with (the table was paused in Level 29 with blinds of 40K/80K with 10K antes), plenty of time for him to look for a moment to strike. Of the remainder of the table, Kenney is the best-known player of the lot, having made a WPT final table before (2014, a third-place finish at the WPT Legends of Poker). While he does have about a third of the chips, Bjerno is the epitome of that old axiom “uneasy lies the head that wears the crown” as he tries to seal the deal in Atlantic City beginning at 2PM this afternoon (live stream with hole cards begins at 2:30 at WPT.com)

Poker News Daily



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