Posts Tagged ‘Panama’

Kenneth Smaron Wins 2017 PokerStars Championship Panama

 Kenneth Smaron Wins 2017 PokerStars Championship Panama

When the six-handed final table of the PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event began, Kenneth Smaron was in third place with 1.855 million chips. He wasn’t in bad shape by any means, but he was still a million chips out of second and two million out of first, so he definitely had an uphill battle. Since I am mentioning his name at the outset, you might have correctly guessed that he climbed that hill successfully, winning the tournament and nearly $ 300,000.

At a typical final table, you have one or two players who tend to dominate or at least hold the chip lead for most of the way before the heads-up portion of the contest. Heads-up, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen. This final table was unique in that aside from Anthony Diotte, who was eliminated on the third hand, every player held the chip lead at some point.

Denis Timofeev began with the largest chip stack, but after Diotte’s elimination, it was Robin Luca Wozniczek who took over, just inching ahead of Timofeev. Wozniczek soon ran into trouble and Timofeev regained the lead. Wozniczek himself was eliminated on the 35th hand (told you he ran into trouble).

Harpreet Gill doubled through Timofeev soon after that and then went on a quick run to make his way to the top of the chip counts. He then got abused by Smaron, highlighted by a pot worth about 2.5 million chips.

For a long time after that, Smaron looked like he was running away with the tournament, building his stack at points to over 6 and 7 million chips. His two competitors, Timofeev and Gill, though, kept forging ahead, eventually pulling into nearly a three-way tie on Hand 156.

The chip lead was upended multiple times in the next few hands before Smaron knocked out Timofeev in third place. Going into heads-up, it was relatively close, with Smaron ahead 6.130 million to 4.895 million.

It didn’t stay close for long, as Smaron won it in just nine hands. On the final hand, Gill limped with T-8, Smaron raised to 350,000 with K-J of clubs, and Gill decided it was time to move all-in for his remaining 2.615 million chips. Smaron thought about it, but finally decided to call (obviously, or else this wouldn’t be the final hand). The flop was great for Smaron without actually giving him a hand – Q-A-9 with two clubs, giving him a royal flush draw. The next two cards did nothing for either player and Smaron won with his King-high.

Smaron, an accomplished online poker player, now has more than $ 1.2 million in live tournament earnings. This was his first major main event title, though he did win the 2015 European Poker Tour Prague High Roller for about half of his total earnings, $ 654,302.

2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event – Final Table Results

1.    Kenneth Smaron – $ 293,860
2.    Harpreet Gill – $ 217,860
3.    Denis Timofeev – $ 161,340
4.    Jonathan Abdellatif – $ 119,480
5.    Robin Luca Wozniczek – $ 88,480
6.    Anthony Diotte – $ 65,520

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2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Day 4: Denis Timofeev Takes Lead as Final Table is Set

 2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Day 4: Denis Timofeev Takes Lead as Final Table is Set

After five days of battle at the Solis Hotel, Spa and Casino in Panama City, the final six men have been determined for the second-ever stop on the PokerStars Championship circuit in Panama. When the final table plays out on Monday, Russia’s Denis Timofeev will continue at the helm as he did on Day 4, but he’ll be sitting atop a 3.905 million chip stack for the penultimate battle.

12 men came back on Sunday with the task of setting the final table for the tournament. Timofeev, as previously stated, was in the lead with slightly more than two millino chips and there were some notable names in the pack behind him. Of particular interest was 2015 GPI Player of the Year Byron Kaverman, who was in third place with 1.236 million in chips, and the man who was the chip leader through the first two days of the tournament, Igor Yaroshevskyy. Yaroshevskyy was on the short stack with 422,000 in chips, however, and needed to make an early move to get back to viability.

It would take less than two hours for the players to eliminate three men and set the unofficial final table. Yaroshevskyy was the man who would earn that dubious honor, pushing all in after Kenneth Smaron put out a raise and Harpreet Gill made the call. Smaron immediately made the call and, after Gill sheepishly showed a A-2 as he mucked, Smaron showed Big Slick. Yaroshevskyy was beaten by a pip, holding Big Chick, but the flop had a sense of humor in coming down K-Q-3. Unfortunately for Yaroshevskyy, he couldn’t find another Queen to best Smaron and headed to the rail in tenth place ($ 27,260) and Smaron took over the lead.

Now with nine men on the redrawn unofficial final table, Timofeev and Kaverman were seated with Kaverman on Timofeev’s immediate left. Although he was out of position to a tough player, the duo didn’t tangle much. Instead, Timofeev took out his aggression on other members of the table. He forced Jonathan Abdellatif to lay a hand down and slowly saw his chip stack inch upwards. As Level 22 began in the tournament (10K/20K with a 3K ante), Timofeev was slightly behind Smaron while Kaverman was having difficulties.

Kaverman never got anything started once play reached the final table, getting his final chips in against Smaron with K-J against Smaron’s pocket treys. A monochrome 6 3 8 flop left Kaverman looking for something that would provide a split pot, but that wouldn’t come when a Queen came on the turn. Once the irrelevant river was dealt (a second Queen), Kaverman was ousted in eighth place and Smaron’s chip lead got bigger.

With one player left to the close of business for the night, play tightened up considerably until one stunning hand between Smaron and Timofeev. On a 9-2-8-4-J board and with 935,000 in the pot, Timofeev pondered his action before checking to the chip leader, normally not a recommended action. Smaron played his position, moving all in against Timofeev, who this time went deep into the tank. After a five minute reconstruction in his mind, Timofeev made the call and saw Smaron had 10-8 for a flopped middle pair. Letting off a relieved sigh, Timofeev showed a J-7 for the rivered top pair and took down the 3.29 million chip pot.

The very next hand, Timofeev stayed active in pushing a bet off the button. James Salmon three bet his stack out of the big blind and, completely unlike his hand with Smaron, Timofeev immediately made the call. His A-10 might have been on the lower end of the call spectrum, but it was the correct move as Salmon only mustered an A-2 for battle. A flopped ten all but ended the proceedings and, after a trey and a four came on the turn and river, Salmon was out in seventh and Timofeev was off to Monday’s final table with the chip lead.

1. Denis Timofeev, 3.095 million
2. Robin Wozniczek, 2.87 million
3. Kenneth Smaron, 1.855 million
4. Jonathan Abdellatif, 1.155 million
5. Harpreet Gill, 735,000
6. Anthony Diotte, 465,000

Play will resume in Panama City at noon on Monday, with the first-ever champion of the PokerStars Championship Panama taking home $ 293,860 for their efforts.

Poker News Daily

2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event: Igor Yaroshevskyy Continues Domination in Leading Day 2

 2017 PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event: Igor Yaroshevskyy Continues Domination in Leading Day 2

After crushing what was the smaller of the Day One fields, Ukrainian poker professional Igor Yaroshevskyy has continued his domination as he holds the Day 2 lead at the PokerStars Championship Panama’s Main Event.

Yaroshevskyy, sitting on top of 219,600 in chips, came into Day 2 with a monstrous lead over the remaining 171 players that remained after 366 players started the event. Second place was a bit of a surprise for many in the form of MMA champion Tito Ortiz, but those who underestimated him on Day 1A fell to his wrath as he amassed 182,000 chips. The Day 1B chip leader, Jiachen Gong, was in fourth place with 154,300 in chips, but he was looking way up at Yaroshevskyy as he strove to catch him.

One of the bits of business that had to be completed at the start of Day 2 in the Solis Hotel, Spa & Casino was setting the official prize pool and payouts for the cast gathered in Panama City. Once late registration closed on the tournament, 366 players had officially come to the party putting up $ 5,000 each to build a $ 1,775,100 prize pool. Officials with the Solis and the PokerStars Championship put their heads together and determined that 71 players would get at least a minimum payday of $ 7720, nearly 20% of the field earning a cash. The big prize for the eventual champion was set at $ 293,860, a nice chunk of change for traipsing to Central America for a poker tournament.

Yaroshevskyy came out of the gates firing on Day 2, knocking off Vicente Delgado on one of the first hands of the day. After Delgado opened the betting, Yaroshevskyy wasted little time in putting out a three bet. Undaunted, Delgado stepped up and made it four bets (21.2K) to go, at which time Yaroshevskyy seemed to have had enough. He asked how much Delgado had behind him, then five bet the action up to 47.5K. Delgado seemed ready for the fight, moving all in at this point, and Yaroshevskyy immediately made the call.

When the cards came face up, at least one of the hands was legitimate. Yaroshevskyy staked his chip lead on pocket Kings (entirely expected), but the table was simply stunned to see Delgado unveiled his A 2 to fight for his tournament life. A Jack high board rolled out (J-5-10-9-8, for the record) to send Delgado, who had been among the bigger stacks in the room, out of the event and Yaroshevskyy’s chip stack up to a dominating 355,000.

That wasn’t even the biggest knockout for Yaroshevskyy on the day. After a raise from Thomas Altamirano and a call from Rafael Moraes, Yaroshevskyy followed suit. With all those chips in the center, a short-stacked Ambrose Ng in the big blind decided to see who was serious by moving all in (16K). Altamirano, it turned out, wasn’t, but Moraes called the bet. This now sparked Yaroshevskyy’s interest as, after a quick peek at Moraes chip stack, he moved enough chips to put Moraes at risk. Moraes made the call to set up a three-way situation (in order of strength):

Yaroshevskyy – pocket tens
Ng – pocket fours
Moraes – A Q

It was all over but the crying when the flop came 8-10-7 to give Yaroshevskyy a crushing set. An Ace on the turn ended it for both Moraes and Ng and, to make it worse for Moraes, a Queen would come on the river for Queens up. That wasn’t good enough against Yaroshevskyy’s set, however, as both Moraes and Ng walked away while Yaroshevskyy’s stack soared to 450,000.

Lather, rinse, repeat…this is the way the day went for the Ukrainian wrecking ball. Late in the afternoon as the number of survivors slipped under 100, Yaroshevskyy was sitting atop a 710,000-chip stack, vastly outpacing his closest competitors. The final level of the day (play stops early in Panama!) played out with a bit of drama as the field tried to reach the money. That didn’t happen, meaning the remaining 78 players will come back on Friday with the first order of business to pop the money bubble.

1. Igor Yaroshevskyy, 745,500
2. Denis Timofeev, 569,000
3. Caufman Talley, 546,000
4. Tito Ortiz, 270,500
5. Vincent Allevato, 256,500
6. Pablo Gordillo, 254,500
7. Pedro Romanzo Pollino, 244,000
8. Eduards Kudrjavcevs, 237,000
9. Jessica Perez Borrego, 235,500
10. Kenneth Smaron, 234,500

Play will resume at noon on Friday in the Solis, with seven very unhappy people being sent out of the tournament arena with nothing to show for their efforts. PokerStars Live! will have all the action as the next champion is determined for the PokerStars Championships.

Poker News Daily

Two Day Ones Completed in PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event, Overall Numbers Down

 Two Day Ones Completed in PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event, Overall Numbers Down

The PokerStars Championships have made their inaugural swing to the Sortis Hotel, Spa and Casino in Panama City, Panama. The $ 3500 Main Event has booked its two-Day Ones at this point, but it is arguable that the overall numbers might be a bit low for the side tournaments and the Main Event.

On Day 1A, slightly more than 100 players would answer the bell for action, with a noted fighter emerging at the top of the standings. While Igor Yaroshevskyy reigned supreme over the Day 1A survivors with his 219,300 in chips, it was retired MMA champion Tito Ortiz who was drawing the lion’s share of attention. Ortiz, who has fought and won championships in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) and most recently fought for Bellator MMA, was in second place behind Yaroshevskyy with his 182,000 in chips, setting himself up for Day Two well. Along with Jason Koon (175,500), Steve O’Dwyer (117,000) and former World Champion Ryan Riess (77,300), the day was replete with notables among the survivors.

Day 1B was expected to bring out a throng of players and it didn’t disappoint. 259 players came to the tables on Wednesday to bring the total number for the tournament to roughly 360 players. Of that number, 128 survived the minefields of Day 1B to join with their 43 counterparts from Day 1A to bring 171 players back to the fray on Day 2 Thursday. With his 154,300 in chips, Jiachen Gong emerged as the chip leader from Day 1B, but he will be down a bit in the overall standings.

1. Igor Yaroshevskyy, 219,600
2. Tito Ortiz, 182,000
3. Jason Koon, 175,500
4. Jiachen Gong, 154,300
5. Caufman Talley, 150,300
6. Martin Kus, 146,800
7. Kamal Abdel Bittar, 146,700
8. Luke Graham, 140,300
9. Vincente Delgado, 138,000
10. Pablo Fernandez, 133,700

What has been the bigger story of the PokerStars Championship Panama is the player numbers that have shown for the preliminary tournaments. Perhaps it is unfair to compare the player response to the Panama event against the PokerStars Championship Bahamas, but it is the only comparison that can be made currently for the “new” tour (the PokerStars Championships have taken over for the European Poker Tour and the “regional” tours that were once part of the PokerStars family). In looking at the comparison, it could be said that the Panama event isn’t drawing as hoped.

The Main Event of the PokerStars Championship Bahamas (itself formerly the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure) saw a respectable crowd of 738 players turn out for the $ 5000 buy in tournament (and that was a low mark for the event – in 2016, 928 players came to the line). Although more than 350 players for a first-time event would be nice for most, for a PokerStars branded event it has to be considered a bit of a disappointment. If that doesn’t do it, then a look at some of the preliminary events – and a comparison to their counterparts in the Bahamas – might paint another picture.

For a $ 1000 “Win the Button” No Limit Hold’em Turbo tournament at the Atlantis event, 68 entries were received in the tournament; at the Panama event, only four entries were received. Another Turbo event, this one for $ 2000, only drew 19 entries from those amassed in Panama City. The $ 50,000 Super High Roller tournament, a staple of the old EPT, brought in only 21 players in Panama, very different from the 68 entries that came in for the Bahamas tournament. The “name” tournaments on the PokerStars schedule – such as their PokerStars Open (a $ 220 buy in tournament) – did draw equivalent numbers, but the PokerStars National Championship was different – a $ 1000 buy in event with re-entry for Panama, a $ 2000 single entry tournament for the Bahamas. Those tournaments saw roughly equivalent prize pools.

These numbers might not be quite as worrisome as it appears, however. The Panama stop is a first-time event, as will be the next stop on the PokerStars Championship circuit in Macau. It won’t be until May, when the PokerStars Championships head to Monte Carlo, where there can be comparisons made to tournaments that existed on the old EPT circuit. But it might be a bit concerning that player numbers are low as it might indicate players aren’t warming to the new “international” PokerStars Championship circuit.

The PokerStars Championship Panama Main Event will continue through the weekend. On Monday, the next champion will be crowned as the PokerStars Championships experiment continues onward.

Poker News Daily

Amaya Gaming, PokerStars Add $600,000 In Guarantees for Panama Championship

 Amaya Gaming, PokerStars Add $600,000 In Guarantees for Panama Championship

After receiving feedback from the players regarding their inaugural event in the Bahamas, officials with PokerStars and Amaya Gaming have made some adjustments to their upcoming stop in Panama. Of interest to most players will be the more than $ 600,000 in guarantees to the tournament schedule, but other factors may drive player interest to head for Central America.

Most of the guaranteed money will be going to one tournament. The PokerStars National Championship – the organization that took over many of the national tours that PokerStars used to operate, including the Latin American Poker Tour – now will have a $ 400,000 guaranteed prize pool for its contestants. With a $ 1100 buy in, it is obvious that PokerStars is trying to drive some interest in this tournament, which replaced the LAPT Main Event.

Three other lower buy-in tournaments will have guarantees placed on them. The PokerStars Cup, a $ 440 buy in event, will have a $ 150,000 guaranteed prize pool. The $ 220 PokerStars Open will have a $ 50,000 guaranteed tournament, while a $ 120 buy in event on the schedule will feature a $ 20,000 guarantee. There are also two $ 120 super satellites for the National Championship that guarantee ten seats and two “freebuy” (no buy-in) satellites for the PokerStars Cup that will guarantee ten seats to the event (the “freebuy” tournaments will feature $ 20 rebuys).

Other aspects of the PokerStars Championship Panama have been adjusted by Amaya Gaming and PokerStars to be more player-friendly. The exhausting 90-plus tournament schedule that was run at the PokerStars Championship Bahamas has been scaled down for Panama, going from the originally scheduled 56 tournaments (that will run from March 10-20 in Panama City at the Casino Sortis Hotel, Spa & Casino) to a more realistic 46 events. The High Roller events will get some special treatment in the form of a “shot clock” – a clock to enforce quicker action – for both the $ 25K High Roller and the $ 50K Super High Roller. Finally, for almost every tournament late registration will be allowed until after Level 8 of the tournament.

The PokerStars Championship Bahamas – the renamed PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, for all intents, for a brand-new tour that used to be the European Poker Tour – suffered a bit under its new auspices. The 92-tournament schedule over a nine-day period was deemed to be far too many by both the players and the staff. Additionally, the expanded payout system, which saw 20% of the field paid instead of the usual 10-15% (the World Series of Poker instituted a 15% payout system last summer), was something that players grumbled over. The total numbers that attended in the Bahamas suffered as a result.

For the $ 5000 PokerStars Championship Bahamas Main Event, a 738-player field was in attendance. While that may sound good for a $ 5000 tournament, this was actually a massive drop from the 928 players that showed up for the tournament just last year (a 20.5% drop in attendance, to be exact) and a far cry from the “glory days” of the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, when 1529 players attended the 2010 PCA (won by Harrison Gimbel). Both High Roller events saw reductions in the number of players (121 with 38 rebuys in 2017 for the $ 25K High Roller versus 173 and 52 in 2016; 41 and 13 in the $ 50K Super High Roller in 2017 versus 44 and 14 just a year earlier), and side events were reportedly sparsely attended.

The first leg of the new tour was the “familiar” part of the schedule and the traditional Bahamas start wasn’t immediately viewed as a bellwether for the new PokerStars Championship. The true indicator of the potential success of the new tour was always going to be the Panama stop (and its next stop in the Asian gaming capital of Macau). With the changes that they have implemented, Amaya and PokerStars officials hope they have now created a tournament stop that will demonstrate the validity of their logic to change from the EPT (and their relevant national tours) to the PokerStars Championship with the true indicator – massive player numbers.

Poker News Daily



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