Posts Tagged ‘payout’

PokerStars Stretching Tournament Payout Structures

 PokerStars Stretching Tournament Payout Structures

In an ongoing effort to satisfy more players, PokerStars is widening the pay structure of many of its tournaments today. In a blog post from late last week, Mike Jones, Poker Operations Manager for PokerStars, took readers through the online poker room’s history with tourney payouts and explained the reason for the changes.

Jones hearkened back to 2002-2006, the years just before and during the online poker boom, when tournaments typically paid out to 10 percent of the field.

“Providing a smooth transition from live to online poker was one of the most important considerations back then, and 10% payouts helped to facilitate that transition,” he wrote.

Jones, continued, pointing out the array of problems with this organization:

There were some serious flaws though: there was often significant deviation from the 10% target; a huge portion of the money went to the final table; first place received too much, the jumps in final table prizes were too severe; the pay tiers were often very large, meaning that large swaths of finishing positions received the same prize; most importantly, nine out of every 10 people who played walked away with nothing to show for their investment of time and money.

Summary: the payouts were extraordinarily top heavy, something that was only good for the winner.

As the years went on, Jones he and his team at PokerStars worked on spreading out the payments within the 10 percent so that there wasn’t such a drop off after the first couple prizes.

“Over the years there was further evolution,” he added. “We moved money away from first place. We moved money away from the final table. We smoothed out the huge pay jumps. We introduced even more granularity to the pay tiers. Anyone remember when 10th-18th all received the same prize? That used to be a thing. We changed that, too. We eventually decided that we didn’t want 90% of the field walking away with nothing and we paid more places.”

When more players make money, Jones noted, stating the obvious, more people walk away happy (or least not pissed off).

“We want more people to have more fun by winning more often, so we’ve continued to make changes big and small: we moved from 10% to 11.1% to 12.5% to 14.2% to 16.6% gradually across the years. The last time we did this was early 2017 when we moved the payouts in most tournaments to 18%, or 1 in 5.5 players.”

And now, the payout structures are being widen once again. Tournaments that had paid 12, 14, 16, or 18 percent of the field will all pay an additional 2 percent of the players, so the deepest payout structure will be to the top 20 percent of finishers.

About 30 percent of PokerStars’ tournaments will not see any changes made to the payouts. Progressive knockout tourneys, tourneys that already pay 20 percent, and some high buy-in events will stay the same.

“The changes will be subtle and most players will only notice when they realize that they’re experiencing the thrill of cashing a little more often,” Jones said. “It’s been years of tinkering to get to this point, and we’ll keep working to create the best overall playing experience.”

The post PokerStars Stretching Tournament Payout Structures appeared first on Poker News Daily.

Poker News Daily

EPT Adjusts Payout Structure Again

 EPT Adjusts Payout Structure Again

Season XIII of the European Poker Tour (EPT) began in August and at that time, a change to the payout structure of the tournaments was announced. It was decided that it would best for the players and the poker economy to increase the number of players in each tournament that cashed, expanding the payout positions from 15 percent of the field to 20 percent.

In an interview with PokerNews, PokerStars Department Head of Live Poker Operations Neil Johnson explained some of the thought process behind the decision:

We started looking at the payouts in a vacuum and to see what made sense. We took all the preconceptions out of it. We saw that if we would pay out 20 percent instead of 15 percent, we could give 5 percent of the field a do-over. It’s effectively like saying ‘Thanks for coming, I hope you had a lot of fun. Sorry you didn’t make it into the big money, good luck the next time because here’s money for another shot.” If someone has a buy-in to play another poker tournament, that’s a good thing. So that’s the direction we ended up going.  

“To keep a healthy poker economy, a solid liquidity for live tournament poker, you need more winners,” Johnson added.

As you can see, the idea was to allow more people to go home happy, even if it meant decreasing the amount of money that would go to the top few finishers. That made many pro poker players unhappy, as they rely on those big payouts to help make up for the tournaments in which they bust out of the money. Not long after the interview, PokerStars went back to a 15 percent payout structure for €50,000 Super High Roller and €25,000 Single-Day High Roller events.

Today, via the PokerStars blog, Johnson announced that the powers that be have rethought the payout issue some more and have reworked it yet again. He said that there was a lot of feedback, causing them to discuss specifically two main issues: how deep the payouts go and what the minimum cash should be in a given tournament. As to the payout depth, he wrote that 20 percent is now the “floor” for payouts rather than the “ceiling.”

As for the min-cash, he said:

…. many players were ok with a 1.1x type cash but many felt like they just got their money back and didn’t ‘win’ anything. Since one of the key points in our change was to create more winners and more winning moments and the 1.1x cash doesn’t necessarily qualify as a winning moment to some of our players an amendment was needed. Therefore we decided to go back and raise the min-cash to something with more substance and it is now in the 1.5x range.

Thus, the EPT has implemented the following:

•    12 to 15 percent payout structure for all events with buy-ins of €10,000 or more
•    17 to 20 percent payout structure for all other events
•    Min-cash will be “around” 1.5 times the buy-in for the events with deeper payout structures

Poker News Daily

EPT Season 13 Begins With New Payout Structure

 EPT Season 13 Begins With New Payout Structure

The thirteenth season of the European Poker Tour (EPT) has started and today marked the opening of the season’s first Main Event, at EPT Barcelona. More on the tournament itself in a later article, but for now, one of the more interesting bits of news coming out of the EPT recently was that PokerStars, which operates the Tour, changed the payout structure of its tournaments. Instead of paying 15 percent of the field, tournaments will now pay down to 20 percent.

In a blog post announcing the decision, PokerStars briefly explained that it was a way to make the events more fun for more people, giving people a chance to at least come away with something, even if they didn’t nab one of the top payouts. Of course, this means that those top payouts will not be as large anymore, as those extra cashes have to come from someone. PokerStars said, though, that the effect shouldn’t be as severe as people might think:

For example, 220 players bought into a €1,000 Hyper at Barcelona last year. The winner collected €45,134 and 31 players were paid out with 31st getting €1,878. This year, the winner would collect €38,028 but 47 players would be paid out with 47th getting €1,238. That same 31st player would get €1,921.

In an interview with PokerNews, PokerStars Department Head of Live Poker Operations Neil Johnson gave additional insight into the decision making process, saying that about half the players in EPT Season 12 played in only one or two events, even though each stop has dozens and dozens of tournaments, many with affordable buy-ins. He continued:

We started looking at the payouts in a vacuum and to see what made sense. We took all the preconceptions out of it. We saw that if we would pay out 20 percent instead of 15 percent, we could give 5 percent of the field a do-over. It’s effectively like saying ‘Thanks for coming, I hope you had a lot of fun. Sorry you didn’t make it into the big money, good luck the next time because here’s money for another shot.” If someone has a buy-in to play another poker tournament, that’s a good thing. So that’s the direction we ended up going.  

“To keep a healthy poker economy, a solid liquidity for live tournament poker, you need more winners,” Johnson added later. “You need more people able to buy in and play so the fields continue to grow. You don’t want to see a situation where it just stagnates, which happens if there’s not getting new money in.”

Johnson said that unlike when the payout structure was increased from 10 to 15 percent, players were not surveyed to seek their input for this latest change. Looking back to the previous change, Johnson recalled:

The options were 10 percent, 12.5 percent, and 15 percent, and all three of them got 33 percent of the votes. Whatever we did, 66 percent was going to be angry. We did what we thought was in the best interest of the poker economy at that time.

This time, we ran all the data we had and decided again to do what we thought was in the best interest of the poker economy and poker players. We’ve done what we think was the right thing to do.

Many pros did not react to the change positively, as the money that is being removed from the upper-end payouts, particularly in the high buy-in tournaments, is a big deal for top tournament players. They don’t want thousands or tens of thousands of dollars being removed from final table positions, as that’s money they count on – as much as one can count on making a final table regularly – to pay the bills and to pay for more tournaments.

Shortly after the PokerNews interview, PokerStars decided to revert back to a 15 percent payout structure for €50,000 Super High Roller and €25,000 Single-Day High Roller events, which makes sense, since those are populated by pros who really don’t care about min-cashes and breaking even on their buy-ins.

Poker News Daily

how to calculate backers payout

 how to calculate backers payout
Can someone give me the formula to figure this out?
ex.
Lets say i sell a live package for $ 8,000 and sold 70% of my action and i win $ 100k .

Am i suppose to subtract original $ 8k then split profit 70/30?

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Payout on different sites

 Payout on different sites
Getting ready to deposit but I wanted to check out the payout experience on the ones that I’m considering.

Bovada
ACR
BetOnline
Juicy Stakes

Anyone know anything about those sites?

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