Posts Tagged ‘poker’

2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Final 13 Players Determined in Event #1 With Italy’s Carlo Savinelli Leading

 2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Final 13 Players Determined in Event #1 With Italy’s Carlo Savinelli Leading

It was moving day at the 2017 World Series of Poker Europe on Sunday as the kickoff tournament for the schedule, the €1000 No Limit Hold’em, tried to reach its final table. While it didn’t reach that audacious goal, the final 13 players were determined with Italy’s Carlo Savinelli holding down the lead.

115 players came back on Sunday afternoon to the King’s Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic, for Day 2 with dreams of a WSOP championship dancing in their heads. Leading the way after a dominant Day 1C was Sander van Wesemael, who held a monstrous stack of 323,500 chips to start action. Following him up were nine-time WSOP Circuit ring winner Valentin Vornicu, Day 1A chip leader Ismael Bojang and Day 1B chip leader Sergio Fernandez. Although these men held big stacks to start the day, they still had to make sure they made it to the money.

With only 85 players receiving a piece of the prize pool (a min-cash earned a player €1952), there would be 30 players who would leave the King’s Casino with nothing but a story to tell. The field went about knocking the numbers down almost immediately as, within two hours, there were only 90 players left. When the time came for the bubble to pop, there was a trio of eliminations rather than the usual one or two.

While hand-for-hand play was going on, Viktor Katzenberger was the first one eliminated. Katzenberger wasn’t alone, however, as Mario Mosbock would be dispatched from the tournament and, moments later, Konstantinos Tsirakidis came to the end of his tournament life. With all three eliminations occurring on the same hand of hand-for-hand play and the 85th and 84th positions in question, the three players chopped up the €3904 amongst each other as the rest of the field celebrated just before the end of the first level of play of the day.

Once the bubble popped, the cash out cage became the place to be. As players like Ivo Donev, defending champion of the event Ryan Hefter, Mike Leah, James Akenhead, Allen Kessler, and Ryan Hughes (earning valuable WSOP POY points) met their tournament demise, several players hit the accelerator to drive to the final table. Both Bojang and Vornicu earned their chips during the run up to and after the money bubble popped, but it was another player who would eclipse them for the overall chip lead by the time the tournament was stopped early Monday morning in Rozvadov.

Savinelli wasn’t doing badly on the day, sitting with about 750,000 in chips, when he entered a four-player hand with Viliyan Petleshkov, Pierre Neuville and Pawel Csichowski. All four would check a very dangerous J-10-9 flop, but a deuce on the turn brought some action. Savinelli bet out 150,000 that saw only Csichowski come along and, after a Queen on the turn brought more intrigue, the fireworks were lit.

Csichowski pushed out the remainder of his stack – roughly 300K in chips – and Savinelli immediately made the call. A disconsolate Csichowski asked if Savinelli had a King and Savinelli indeed did…in fact, he had two with his pocket pair of Cowboys. Csichowski could only turn up his 8-6 for the bottom end of the straight and head to the cage to pick up his 15th place payday.

Using that elimination, Savinelli would cruise through the remaining half hour of the evening. When officials with the WSOP, noting that there was little chance of getting to the nine-handed official final table, called the end of the day at 2AM local time, Savinelli claimed the top slot on the leaderboard for Day 2 of Event #1.

1. Carlo Savinelli, 1.34 million
2. Serge Danis, 1.19 million
3. Ismael Bojang, 1.12 million
4. Viliyan Petleshkov, 1.035 million
5. Sergio Fernandez, 980,000
6. Pierre Neuville, 823,000
7. Oleksandr Shcherbak, 780,000
8. Georgios Zisimopoulos, 775,000
9. Peter Bstieler, 765,000
10. Ali Sameeian, 760,000
11. Rene Crha, 685,000
12. Alexandre Viard, 640,000
13. Walter Treccarichi, 310,000

The remaining 13 men will return to the felt at 2PM on Monday, with the first bracelet of the 2017 WSOP-E set to be awarded sometime tomorrow night in the King’s Casino. At the same time, Event #2 on the schedule, the €500 Pot Limit Omaha tournament, will kick off its Day 1 action. It will be a busy day in Rozvadov on Monday as the 2017 World Series of Poker kicks into full throat.

The post 2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Final 13 Players Determined in Event #1 With Italy’s Carlo Savinelli Leading appeared first on Poker News Daily.

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Five Things to Consider Before You Say “I Suck at Poker”

 Five Things to Consider Before You Say “I Suck at Poker”

Everyone has different standards of what constitutes success in the world of poker. For some, it is the ability to hold their own in a cash game in a casino. For others, it is playing on the most difficult tables in the world and stare down the most hardcore professionals imaginable. For more yet, it is the ability to make money at the game, be it as a second income or to make a living. But there are those, however, who simply say “I suck at poker,” and never really examine the situation. Here’s five things to look at if you’ve asked yourself this question.

WHY ARE YOU PLAYING?

For some, the reason they are coming to the table is the first problem Without knowing why you’re there, you can’t have a firm philosophy on how to go forward. You should ask one honest questions of yourself…why are you playing?

If you’re playing for recreation and can afford to lose a bit of $ , then there isn’t a problem. You’re enjoying yourself and, if that money lost isn’t critical to your everyday life, walk away and simply partake in the game when you want to. The problem might set in if you’re looking at poker as a second income or if you’re looking to be the next (insert poker “professional’s” name here). If that is the case, then you must move onto the next stage of questioning.

ARE YOU STUDYING YOUR CRAFT?

If the latter is the case, what time and effort are you putting into reading about the game or watching training videos? The carcasses of people who think they can just waltz into a poker room and dominate the game litter the roadside of the poker highway because they weren’t prepared for the game. Without adequate study, you will be a consistent loser at the game of poker. If you aren’t thinking about the game – and it can be for a few hours a week (if you’re a part-time player) or as much as 6-8 hours a week or more (if you’re considering it your main method of income), then there are going to be plenty of problems for you.

GOT MONEY?

If you are putting in training and/or reading, then it could be a question of your bankroll.

Players will have different temperaments when they are staked appropriately. If they’ve got enough money to weather the variance that occurs in the game, then they will make the appropriate plays at the table. Likewise, if a player is putting too much of their bank on the table at any one given time, there are likelihoods that they won’t be willing to pull the trigger when they need to.

Additionally, the stakes that a player is playing for can cause issues. There is a tremendous difference in playing $ 1/$ 2 No Limit Hold’em in the casino versus playing even $ 5/$ 10. A comparison online might be the difference between playing $ .01/$ .02 and $ 1/$ 2. It may be a mental issue, but the strategies and actions at the higher levels could lead to a player playing less than optimally.

The essential question is are you playing too high a stake for your bankroll, thus causing you to play “scared” rather than at your optimum? Or are you putting up too much of your bankroll, trying to play to keep the money in the stack rather than playing the aggressive game necessary to win?

“BUT THE GAME WAS ON…”

Some players can keep their minds on the game through anything. There could be a GWAR concert going on in the card room, a bare-knuckle brawl 30 feet off to the right and Sofia Vergara cooing sweet nothings in his ear (or, for the ladies, Matthew McConaughey nibbling on your neck) and that player would be able to maintain the concentration to be able to make the correct decision. This is an ability that successful players have – the ability to keep their mind in the game – and it is something that keeps other players from being successful.

Those that are easily sidetracked by what goes on at the table (be it on tilt from a beat or a conversation going around) or by what might be on one of the televisions around the room (plenty of poker rooms have scores of televisions, normally tuned to sports) are not going to be able to mentally process the actions at the table. This distraction will cause missed actions by opponents, tells, or other opportunities that a player might be able to exploit if they were paying attention. By tuning out the televisions and other distractions, a player can increase their chances in making the right decisions.

IF IT WALKS LIKE A DUCK…

If you’ve covered all the previous areas, then there’s a chance that yes, you do suck. But it isn’t the end of the world.

In most cases, those players who aren’t very good have been playing too much by “feel.” While sometimes a gut instinct can be a good thing, players who lean too much on the “feel” area can have extremely wide swings in their game. A player can have a great deal of success initially at the game and, once that rush cools off, suddenly cannot make a correct decision to save their poker life. If that is happening, then it is time to go back to school and the start of this article. With hope, that player who is saying to themselves, “I suck at this game,” can go about getting the right background to be able to get better.

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2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Sizeable Day 1C Crowd Brings New Leader to Overall Standings

 2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Sizeable Day 1C Crowd Brings New Leader to Overall Standings

As expected on Saturday, Day 1C of the €1000 No Limit Hold’em Monster Stack at the 2017 World Series of Poker Europe was the largest of the three-Day Ones. After the day’s action, a new overall leader for the tournament was crowned as Day Two looms on the horizon.

How big was Saturday’s field? The players were flocking to the felt for the very start of the day’s play, something that is usually unheard of in a tournament. 127 players were already on their respective tables with their 20,000 in chips. By the end of the first level of fourteen for the day, the field jumped up to 183 and showed little signs of slowing down.

Among those taking their patch of felt were players who had previously been entered in the tournament. According to the rules of the Monster Stack, players could re-enter the tournament if they busted out of Days 1A and/or 1B. Players such as Kunal Patni, Kenny Hallaert, Aylar Lie, Alex Foxen, Kristen Bicknell and Thomas Pettersson made the maximum donation to the prize pool (€3000) and were looking for a cash to offset the early expenditure at the WSOP-E.

The Monster Stack had a guarantee on it (€500,000), so King’s Casino and WSOP-E officials were pleased when that was cracked just after Level 4 began. The 261 entries that were on the Day 1C clock brought the total number up to 516 total entries and, with another four levels of late registration available, there was a nice prize pool being built for the first event of the 2017 WSOP-E.

By the time the late registration period had ended and Level 9 began after dinner, there were 306 players registered for Day 1C. That brought the total to 561 entries for the three-Day Ones, building a prize pool of €538,280 for the top 85 finishers to divvy up. The first-place payday will award the first bracelet of the 2017 WSOP-E and give that fortunate champion a €117,708 payday.

As the tournament drove into the Czech evening, the body count of players who had been sent to the rail began to rise. Kenny Hallaert, John Racener, Erik Cajelais, Brandon Cantu, Phil Hellmuth, Felipe Ramos and Bicknell were all out soon after the dinner break. For a select few, however, they would rewrite the overall leaderboard.

One player in particular was on the move throughout the day, but in the final level of the night he kicked in the afterburners. Sander van Wesemael was sitting on an impressive stack of 137K in chips when Level 14 began, but a battle he started with Veysel Kortan completely changed his fortunes.

The leader heading into the final level of the day, Kortan decided that he wanted to get fancy and began blind raising every hand. After one Kortan blind raise, van Wesemael decided to stand up and three-bet the action, which Kortan called. An A♠ Q♠ 8♠ monochrome flop brought a check-raise out of Kortan, taking van Wesemael’s 10K bet up to 28K, which was called by van Wesemael. Kortan kept the pressure on a nine on the turn and, on a King river to put plenty of possibilities on board, Kortan would move all in.

Now it was time for van Wesemael to think about the hand for a bit and, although the clock was called, he made his decision before a floorman could get to the table for the count. Van Wesemael called to put his tournament life at stake and it was the right move as his A Q was good over Kortan’s sheepishly turned up 7-3 air to shoot van Wesemael to 300,000 in chips. Soon afterwards, Kortan was out of the door instead of heading to Day 2.

1. Sander van Wesemael, 323,500
2. Valentin Vornicu, 296,500
3. Giovanni Petroni, 239,000
4. Scott Stewart, 207,500
5. Tobias Bornefalk, 207,000
6. Pawel Czichowski, 199,000
7. Emil Lukac, 192,000
8. Thanh Hoang, 179,000
9. Konstantinos Tsirakidis, 178,000
10. Christophe Pereira, 170,000

With the conclusion of Day 1C, van Wesemael will become the overall leader of the tournament. In fact, the top five from Day 1C make up half the Top Ten overall leaderboard:

1. Sander van Wesemael, 323,500
2. Valentin Vornicu, 296,500
3. Ismael Bojang, 268,500*
4. Sergio Fernandez, 267,000**
5. Jeff Cormier, 265,000*
6. Giovanni Petroni, 239,000
7. Micky Blasi, 213,000*
8. Ryan Hefter, 208,000***
9. Scott Stewart, 207,500
10. Tobias Bornefalk, 207,000

(* – Day 1A player)
(** – Day 1B player)
(*** – Day 1A player, defending champion)

All totaled, 114 players survived the three days of action in the King’s Casino tournament arena and one of them will be the eventual champion of Event #1. Day 2 kicks off on Sunday and is expected to play down to the first champion of the WSOP Europe, but it is entirely possible that the tournament may have to go into “overtime” with the number of players remaining.

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Matt Savage and World Poker Tour Issues Statement Regarding Taking Shooting Star Off Season XVI Schedule

 Matt Savage and World Poker Tour Issues Statement Regarding Taking Shooting Star Off Season XVI Schedule

The World Poker Tour recently released the remainder of its Season XVI schedule and, for the most part, the usual suspects were a part of the roster of events. There was one quite noticeable absence, however, as the Bay 101 Shooting Star was not in its usual spot between the WPT L. A. Poker Classic and the WPT Rolling Thunder.

On the WPT schedule since the Season II schedule, the Bay 101 Shooting Star was one of the most popular tournaments on the WPT schedule. Until recently, it was unique in that it was the only bounty tournament on the WPT schedule. Players could enter the event (it started as a $ 10,000 buy-in tournament but, by last year, the buy-in was reduced to $ 7500) and, if they eliminated a few of the 50 poker professionals who were “bounties” in the tournament, they could eliminate their buy-in without having to cash. It also awarded a bonus payout for the leaders after the two-part Day Ones.

These little bonuses for the players brought them out in droves. Professional poker players scrambled to be named one of the “bounties” for the tournament, wearing it as a badge of honor to signify that they were a “notable” in the tournament poker world. It also translated into very nice crowds for the tournament. After starting in 2004 with what was then an unheard of 243 players (and a rousing final table that featured poker pro Phil Gordon defeating defending World Champion Chris Moneymaker for the championship), the 2017 version of the tournament brought in 806 entries, its best performance in its history (and saw Sam Panzica win his second event of the Season XV schedule).

Thus, the actual background on why the WPT didn’t have the Bay 101 Shooting Star on the schedule was a bit of a mystery. The reason for the removal of the fan- and player-favorite tournament wasn’t given in any press release from the WPT or from Bay 101, but now someone for whom the tournament is near to their heart has spoken up. In reaction to Poker News Daily’s editorial on the subject, WPT Executive Tournament Director Matt Savage reached out, clearing away the cobwebs as to why the Bay 101 was taken off the Season XVI schedule.

Poker News Daily: OK, let’s get right to it. Why isn’t the Bay 101 Shooting Star on the Season XVI schedule?

Matt Savage:  It was mutually agreed upon between officials on both sides that the Bay 101 would not be a part of the Season XVI World Poker Tour schedule. Bay 101 will always have a special place in the WPT history books and we would encourage players to continue to visit our friends at Bay 101 Casino.

PND:  Will the Bay 101 Shooting Star return to the schedule in the future?

MS:  We have seen events return to the WPT schedule in the past, as evidenced by the most recent return of the Lucky Hearts Poker Open (at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Hollywood, FL) to the Season XVI schedule. We have a group of very exciting events on the roster, including the six newly announced stops, and we look forward to players joining us in Europe (the first-ever WPT European Championship will be contested in January) and throughout the United States and Canada.

PND:  The Bay 101 Shooting Star is something that is very close to your heart, having created the tournament. What are your thoughts on the subject?

MS:  If we are going to do the Shooting Star tournament, I want to do it right. The Shooting Star may be a no-go this year on the WPT, but of course I’d love to run it this year and, hopefully, we can bring it back to the WPT in 2019.

Poker News Daily would like to thank Matt for clearing up the story a bit regarding the Bay 101 Shooting Star. While it would be good to see it continue uninterrupted, players can hope that it returns in some manner – whether it be a “stand alone” tournament or as a part of the WPT roster of events.

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2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Sergio Fernandez Paces Field, Ismael Bojang Still Overall Leader

 2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Sergio Fernandez Paces Field, Ismael Bojang Still Overall Leader

The second day of the 2017 World Series of Poker Europe is in the books with the close of Day 1B of Event #1, the €1000 No Limit Hold’em Monster Stack. Although Sergio Fernandez would end the day with the Day 1B edge over the 35 players left, it is still Ismael Bojang who can claim the overall lead.

The early afternoon starting time at the King’s Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic (2PM local time, 8AM Eastern Time), saw several new faces come to the fore. Chris Ferguson, looking to lengthen his lead in the WSOP Player of the Year race, was a late entry on the day, but he could do nothing in the short time he was on the felt after dinner. A player known for his late arrivals, Phil Hellmuth, held true to form by coming into the King’s Casino after the dinner break.

It didn’t seem that the late arrival helped Hellmuth a bit. On an A-4-4 flop, Hellmuth fired a 2000 chip bet into a 4500 pot and only Maxim Lykov made the call. After checking the 9 on the turn, a 7♣ on the river seemed to wake up both men. Hellmuth felt confident as he fired off another 4000-chip bet but, after Lykov three bet the action to 11K (to build a pot around 23K), Hellmuth pondered just what Lykov could be holding. In the end, Hellmuth decided he needed to know and made the call, with Lykov showing him he had rivered Hellmuth with his pocket sevens catching the boat to defeat Hellmuth’s A♠ J♠ for the flopped two pair.

The battle with Lykov chopped Hellmuth’s stack in half from its 20K starting level and the “Poker Brat” would never recover. With his withering stack, Hellmuth would push the action with pocket fives and ran them into an opponent holding pocket sixes and Chi Cuong Huynh’s J-10. After the board was kind to Huynh, coming down with not only a Jack and a ten but no sixes or fives, Hellmuth was relegated to the rail and sentenced to a final shot on Saturday if he is to stick around for Day 2 of the Monster Stack.

By the time the dinner break had rolled around, another 158 players had put an entry in, with many of those players in on their second bullet in the tournament (the Monster Stack allows players eliminated on Day 1A to reenter on Day 1B and, if eliminated again, to come back on Day 1C). Prior to the dinner break, two-time buyers including Kunal Patni, Kristen Bicknell, Thomas Pettersson, Marc MacDonnell, John Racener (trying to catch Ferguson in the POY), and Kenny Hallaert were all on the rail for a second time. After the dinner break, Roberto Romanello, Aleksandar Tomovic, Casey Kastle, and Felipe Ramos would join those ranks.

The Day 1B ride was pleasant for some who were in for a second bullet. Lykov finished the day as the fifth-place stack of the 35 players remaining, while Pierre Neuville was able to build a good stack in ending the day in eighth place. They will both be looking up to Fernandez, who is only about 1500 in chips behind overall leader Bojang:

1. Sergio Fernandez, 267,000
2. Rene Crha, 186,500
3. Fahredin Mustafov, 183,000
4. Viliyan Petleshkov, 178,500
5. Maxim Lykov, 153,500
6. Aneris Adomkevicius, 153,000
7. Robert Schulz, 143,000
8. Pierre Neuville, 122,500
9. Dario Marinelli, 117,000
10. Usman Siddique, 111,000

The two-Day Ones completed have a total of 50 players remaining with Day 1C yet to play:

1. Ismael Bojang, 268,500
2. Sergio Fernandez, 267,000
3. Jeff Cormier, 265,000
4. Micky Blasi, 213,000
5. Ryan Hefter, 208,000*
6. Rene Crha, 186,500
7. Fahredin Mustafov, 183,000
8. Viliyan Petleshkov, 178,500
9. Maxim Lykov, 153,500
10. Aneris Adomkevicius, 153,000

(* – defending champion)

To this mark, the tournament has booked 255 entries (90 for Day 1A, 165 for Day 1B), but Day 1C should see a rush to the tables. The players will learn what they are playing for once late registration closes at Level 8 of Day 1C and the battle will then truly be on for the first bracelet of the 2017 World Series of Poker Europe.

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