Posts Tagged ‘Ryan’

Ryan Tosoc Wins 2017 WPT Five Diamond Poker Classic

 Ryan Tosoc Wins 2017 WPT Five Diamond Poker Classic

Let’s just say that Ryan Tosoc will be staying at the Bellagio whenever he is in Las Vegas. This weekend, Tosoc won the World Poker Tour (WPT) Five Diamond World Poker Classic Main Event and nearly $ 2 million, just a year after finishing this same tournament as the runner-up and earning over $ 1.1 million. Methinks he can splurge for the Bellagio’s Presidential Suite* during his next stay.

Last year’s event was the largest-ever for the Five Diamond, as it garnered 791 entries. This one was bigger, with the re-entry format helping the field climb to 812 $ 10,000 entries. If you did the math above (with my rounded-off numbers), Tosoc has now won more than $ 3 million at the Five Diamond, accounting for the vast majority of his live tournament earnings. He has a nice list of cashes, but only one other is even in the low six-figure range (and it is at this point that I give my usual disclaimer that I would KILL for a low six-figure poker score).

“It feels unreal,” Tosoc told WPT.com afterward. “I kind of feel like I’m in a dream right now.”

Poker can be an emotional game, especially since you can make perfect decisions and still come out on the losing end, but Tosoc tried not to get too high or too low during the Main Event.

“During the tournament, I like to just keep even-keeled,” he said. “The only time like I felt like I was going to win was when I was all in with Queen-Ten. I just felt that jack coming.”

It is not every day that players feel ultra-confident when all-in with just Queen-Ten, but I guess that’s the mojo you get when you are on your way to winning one of the World Poker Tour’s most prestigious events.

That Queen-Ten was on the final hand of the tournament and frankly, Tosoc had every right to feel that victory was coming, as he had an enormous chip lead at that point over Alex Foxen, 21.450 million chips to just 2.925 million.

Tosoc raised pre-flop with the aforementioned hole cards, as one would expect, and then Foxen shoved all-in with a dominated A-T. With little to lose by calling (and not REALLY all-in), Tosoc looked him up.

The flop was 9-3-K, a good one for Foxen, though Tosoc did gain a gutshot straight draw. As he already told WPT.com, he felt the Jack coming and it certainly did so on the turn. Foxen, though, now had a chance at a better straight. Another Jack was dealt on the river, shutting the door on Foxen’s chances and given Ryan Tosoc a one-spot better finish than last year and his first WPT title.

2017 World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic Main Event – Final Table Results

1. Ryan Tosoc – $ 1,958,065
2. Alex Foxen – $ 1,134,202
3. Mike Del Vecchio – $ 752,196
4. Sean Perry – $ 504,090
5. Away Chabra – $ 350,500
6. Richard Kirsch – $ 271,736

*I do not know if the Bellagio has something called the Presidential Suite.

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2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 4 – Sean Perry Leads Final Table with Ryan Tosoc, Mike Del Vecchio in Pursuit

 2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 4 – Sean Perry Leads Final Table with Ryan Tosoc, Mike Del Vecchio in Pursuit

The penultimate day of the 2017 World Poker Tour’s Five Diamond World Poker Classic is set for play on Sunday afternoon at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. After almost a week of play Sean Perry, the son of poker professional Ralph Perry, sits in the first slot on the leaderboard, but Ryan Tosoc (making his second consecutive WPT Five Diamond final table) and Mike Del Vecchio (who has been around the top of the leaderboard all tournament) in pursuit.

The final 18 players came back to the felt on Saturday to work to the final six. At the start of action on Saturday, Ajay Chabra was looking down at those in pursuit. It was quite a list of players in pursuit of him, with high stakes cash game player Lauren Roberts, ‘Big One for One Drop’ champion Dan Colman, Perry, Tosoc and Del Vecchio all arranged on the board behind Chabra. With plans to play until the final six were determined and the players decently stacked for battle, the players, floormen and rail all settled in for battle.

With the WPT “Action Clock” running on the tables (each player would have 30 seconds to make their decision unless they use one of their “time bank” chips to add another 30 seconds), the players wasted little time getting the chips moving. Chabra opened an early hand from under the gun, only to see Jerry Humphrey hammer all in over his bet. Chabra made the call and was behind, his Big Slick looking up at Humphrey’s pocket Aces, but the Q-9-J flop provided a bit of excitement. The Queen on the river and the nine on the turn, however, were less than exciting for Chabra as he sent a sizeable stack of chips to Humphrey.

The news wasn’t as good for another participant looking to make a move. Roman Korenev pushed out a bet and Foxen moved all in immediately following his bet. Korenev made the call once the action returned to him and it was the classic race, Korenev’s Big Chick (A-Q) against Foxen’s pocket fives. A 9-9-5 flop left Korenev basically drawing dead and, after a trey on the turn, it became officially drawing dead. After the meaningless river card was dealt, the chips were counted and Foxen was found to be the one with his tournament life on the line. It was a slim margin, however, as Korenev was left with only 2000 in chips after the count; he would depart on the very next hand.

After Satish Surapaneni was dispatched in 17th place, the players were redrawn to two tables. Chabra, who had been quiet to this point, suddenly came to life with a bet and a Tosoc call. Humphrey, looking to get in the game, pushed all in for around 500K in chips and sat back. In the big blind, Michael Ruane simply made the call but Chabra wasn’t content with that. He would move all in himself and force Tosoc and Ruane to a decision for their tournament lives. Tosoc got out of the way, but Ruane stuck around and made the call.

When the hands were turned up, it basically had played itself:

Humphrey:  pocket tens
Ruane:  pocket Kings
Chabra:  pocket Aces

A monochrome 4♣ A♣ 8♣ flop hit, giving Chabra a set but giving Ruane a draw as his King was of the club variety. A J on the turn left Humphrey drawing dead, leaving the remaining drama to Chabra and Ruane. Ruane had a momentary flash of happiness when he saw the river J♣ that gave him a flush, but it quickly disappeared when he realized it also gave Chabra a full house. In that one monster hand, Humphrey was out in sixteenth place, Ruane in fifteenth and Chabra sat on a 6.65 million chip stack.

The double knockout seemed to open the floodgates for the players to start hitting the rail. Colman was knocked out in fourteenth place by Foxen, while Perry would take down Day 3 chip leader Blake Bohn in thirteenth. By the time that Mel Wiener was eliminated by Tosoc on the unofficial final table bubble (tenth place), Tosoc and Perry were atop the leaderboard and driving to the final table.

There was the little factor of determining which three players wouldn’t be a part of the official six-handed WPT final table. First out was Ray Pulford, who felt confident pre-flop in taking his pocket Queens against Perry’s baby Ace (A♣ 3♣). His Queens were vanquished on the A-J-10 flop and he wouldn’t find a King (for a Broadway straight) or a Queen on the turn or river to depart in ninth place. Roberts fought valiantly in her effort to best her seventh-place finish in this tournament last year, but she was crippled by Del Vecchio’s quad deuces before leaving in eighth place courtesy of Chabra. With only one more knockout to ending the evening’s action, Del Vecchio delivered in taking down Daniel Zack, A-K versus A-Q, to send Zack out in seventh place and set the final six combatants.

1. Sean Perry, 7.65 million (Seat 2)
2. Ryan Tosoc, 5.105 million (Seat 3)
3. Mike Del Vecchio, 4.97 million (Seat 1)
4. Ajay Chabra, 3.065 million (Seat 4)
5. Richard Kirsch, 2.62 million (Seat 5)
6. Alex Foxen, 955,000 (Seat 6)

Perry has the potential to be one of the youngest champions ever on the WPT. Turning 21 the very day the WPT Five Diamond began, he has a chance at a historic achievement that will be difficult to duplicate. With Tosoc and Del Vecchio in shooting distance and on his right (Del Vecchio) and left (Tosoc), he’s going to have to tread lightly (or get hit with the deck). It would be a mistake to count out Chabra or Kirsch, although they need a double to really get back in the action. About the only player who is a “long shot” is Foxen, who needs a lot of help to get his chip stack back to health.

The final table of the 2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic will kick off at 4:30PM (Pacific time) this afternoon and can be viewed over the streaming network PokerGO. At stake for the players is the $ 1.958 million that will go to the eventual champion and the seat to the 2018 WPT Tournament of Champions next spring.

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2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Ismael Bojang Leads Event #1, Defending Champ Ryan Hefter in Top Five

 2017 World Series of Poker Europe: Ismael Bojang Leads Event #1, Defending Champ Ryan Hefter in Top Five

If it is an odd-numbered year, it means that the World Series of Poker is taking its show to Europe. This year the WSOP-E has landed at the King’s Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic, where the next fortnight will see 11 bracelets contested. Up first for the players is Event #1, the €1000 No Limit Hold’em Monster Stack tournament.

Thursday afternoon saw the first of three-Day Ones take flight, with the players holding the option of playing in all three in an attempt to build a stack. Those three-Day Ones were going to be long ones, with 14 levels of play and late registration open until the start of Level 8. As Day 1A hit the felt, it was a bit of a surprise how many top players were a part of the proceedings.

John Racener, who is vying with Chris Ferguson for the WSOP Player of the Year award, was in his chair from the start of action. He was joined by six-time WSOP bracelet winner Jeffrey Lisandro, Felipe Ramos, Ryan Hughes, James Akenhead, and Roland Israelashvili, with each player getting a generous 20,000 chip stack to start the day with. As the afternoon wore on, Racener’s main opposition Ferguson made an appearance on the tables along with Maxim Lykov and Kristen Bicknell as the first break of the day saw the tournament clock informing the field that 63 players were already in the game.

As the sun began to set on Rozvadov, more top pros came out for their first appearance of the WSOP-E. Former “November Niner” Pierre Neuville, Erik Cajelais, Roberto Romanello, Mike Leah all came to the tables, but Bicknell and Ramos exited at least the Day 1A proceedings. By the time that the clock ended Level 8 and the late registration process, 90 entries were in the books and dinner was served.

Now set in the fact that no other players would be joining the festivities, players got about the work of building a respectable stack to move to Day 2. With only 47 of those players coming back from dinner, a slight change was made to the schedule for Event #1, with the plan to play until either 15 players were left or go all the way through the full 14 levels scheduled. As it turned out, that was a solid decision by WSOP officials as the field whittled itself down to 15 just after Level 14 began:

1. Ismael Bojang, 268,500
2. Jeff Cormier, 265,000
3. Micky Blasi, 213,000
4. Ryan Hefter, 208,000
5. Oleksandr Shcherbak, 140,000
6. Hannes Neurauter, 106.000
7. Ricardo, Chauriye, 96,000
8. Mike Leah, 96,000
9. Ryan Hughes, 81,500
10. Theodoros Aidonopoulos, 75,000
11. Yaniv Botbol, 72,000
12. Carlo Savinelli, 55,500
13. James Akenhead, 46,500
14. Romain Follet, 44,500
15. Zdenko Slavik, 33,000

Bojang, despite having extensive experience in international poker, has never won a major tournament. Hefter, however, has, earning the championship in this very event in 2015 when it was last played.

Although Ferguson, Lykov and plenty of other players were eliminated on Day 1A, they all can come back on Day 1B and/or Day 1C to attempt to build a stack. The short stacks from Day 1A, Slavik and Follet, are unfortunately locked into Day 2 with their stacks, but the Top Five will be comfortable in their positions for Sunday’s Day 2 play.

Day 1B will kick off at 2PM in Rozvadov (8AM Eastern Time) and the field should be much larger than the 90 players who showed on Thursday. This tournament will be the only action around the King’s Casino for the weekend as Event #2, the €500 Pot Limit Omaha tournament, is not set to begin until Monday. The action will definitely heat up as the players drift into the Czech Republic and the 2017 World Series of Poker Europe hits its full stride.

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Ryan Riess Picks Up Second Leg of Triple Crown, Wins WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale

 Ryan Riess Picks Up Second Leg of Triple Crown, Wins WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale

Working his way through one of the final $ 10,000 buy-in events left on the World Poker Tour schedule, former World Champion Ryan Riess emerged from a tough final table to take the second leg of poker’s “Triple Crown” in winning the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale last night.

Coming into the action on Thursday, Riess was second in chips (with his 3.09 million stack) behind only former WPT champion Alan Sternberg, who was on top of the final table with 4.605 million chips. There were potential trouble spots in every other seat, with 2016 “November Niner” Cliff Josephy (1.855 million) and top pros Tim West (1.995 million) and Jason Koon (1.03 million) awaiting the battle. Even arguably the least experienced player on the table, Terry Schumacher (1.385 million), had a lengthy international poker resume (with Hendon Mob flags from Australia, Spain, the U. S. and his native Belgium) that made him dangerous.

The players wasted little time getting the action going in the Hard Rock tournament arena. Only 18 hands into the final table, Josephy would take his shot at moving into contention, but he chose the wrong time to take that shot. Moving in with an A-J off suit after a West raise, Sternberg woke up in the big blind with pocket Kings and made the call. Once West’s cards found the muck, the race was on between the duo. After it came down ten high – with nigh an Ace or Jack in the mix – Josephy was out in sixth place and Sternberg increased his lead over the field.

A quick nine hands later, the next elimination hit the rail. Schumacher defended his blind after a raise from Koon to see an A-J-4 rainbow flop. Schumacher would check-call a bet from Koon and, after a seven came on the turn, would check-call another bet from Koon. When the 8 came on the river – the third heart offering a flush possibility as well as going runner-runner on a potential straight – Schumacher checked again and Koon moved all in.

Now Schumacher paused, mulling the action in his head before making the river decision. Schumacher made the call and Koon surprisingly showed nothing but air – a Q-10 off suit that missed everything. Schumacher opened his bluff catcher, an A-6 for a pair of Aces, to take the hand and send Koon home in fifth place.

After Koon was away from the table, the tournament bogged down as the remaining four players battled it out. West was on the verge of elimination at a couple of points, but was able to survive one through chopping the pot and another when he doubled through. Unfortunately, that isn’t a way to stay viable in a tournament, as West found out on Hand 74.

In a blind versus blind battle, West moved all in and Riess decided to look him up, which turned out to be the right decision. Riess’ A-10 was ahead of West’s K-J, but the Q-J-2 flop moved West into the lead. Just as quickly as the poker gods gave, however, they would take away; a King on the turn made two pair for West but filled out Broadway for Riess to push him back in front. Needing another Jack or a King on the river, the innocent seven didn’t help West at all as he was eliminated in fourth place.

With two big stacks around him, Schumacher never could mount much offense in the three-handed battle. Watching his chips bleed away, Schumacher would put in his final chips in after a bet from Sternberg and a call from the small blind by Riess. The all-in move by Schumacher was good enough to get Sternberg out, but Riess made the call and saw his pocket nines were ahead of Schumacher’s J 7. Nothing helpful came for Schumacher on the A-6-5-K-4 board, eliminating the Belgian in third place and sending Riess to heads up action against Sternberg with a slight (1.5 million) chip disadvantage.

Deeply stacked, Sternberg and Riess were expected to fight it out over an extended period, but the end came rather quickly. Riess would chip pieces out of Sternberg’s stack to take a small lead over the former WPT champion before, on Hand 210, the end would come. Riess would open the betting with a 450K bet and Sternberg popped him to 1.15 million. Riess aggressively moved all in with his dominant chip stack and, after pondering his options, Sternberg made the call to see what would be the final flop of the tournament.

It was a race situation between the combatants, with Riess’ Big Slick racing against Sternberg’s pocket sevens, and it turned out Riess had a better engine. A King on the flop with two sixes gave Riess Kings up and, after another King came on the turn, Sternberg was drawing dead. Once a ten came on the river to officially complete the hand, Riess was celebrating winning the championship of the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale.

1. Ryan Riess, $ 716,088 and a seat in the WPT Tournament of Champions
2. Alan Sternberg, $ 491,081
3. Terry Schumacher, $ 315,726
4. Tim West, $ 204,466
5. Jason Koon, $ 157,599
6. Cliff Josephy, $ 130,370

With the victory, Riess has now completed the second leg of poker’s “Triple Crown.” The 2013 World Series of Poker $ 10,000 Championship Event victor now only needs a Main Event victory on the PokerStars Championships (the replacement for the European Poker Tour) stage to complete the trifecta, something that could be well within his grasp with his career earnings (over $ 10 million) and his youthful age (26).

There is still one more tournament on the schedule for the WPT at the Seminole Hard Rock and it is the Season XV closer. The WPT Tournament of Champions, with a field comprised only of the past season’s champions and WPT Champions’ Club members (players who have previously won a WPT event), begins this afternoon. There is hope that, with various amenities added as prizes and $ 100,000 added to the prize pool (the Season XV champions have already had $ 15,000 pulled from their prize money for their seat; former champions must pony up the ducats), that the field will be larger than last year’s disappointing 64 players (out of a potential 227 players).

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2016 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 5: Final Table Determined with James Romero, Ryan Tosoc Leading Justin Bonomo

 2016 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 5: Final Table Determined with James Romero, Ryan Tosoc Leading Justin Bonomo

The final table has been determined for the 2016 World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic Main Event and it is shaping up to be an impressive battle. While James Romero has been able to pull away from the pack a bit, players such as Ryan Tosoc and Justin Bonomo (just to name a couple) are poised to try to take him down.

Starting the action on Friday, the 19 players remaining were looking to capture one of the sextet of seats that would be in action later today. Tosoc was at the helm of the pack with Bonomo in pursuit, but it was three-time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour who was drawing the attention down the leaderboard. Unfortunately for Seymour, his deep run in this WPT event ended earlier than he wanted on Friday afternoon.

About two hours into the Day 5 play, Tosoc pushed out a bet and Seymour put him to the test by moving all in. Tosoc debated his situation for a couple of minutes before making the call, finding his K-Q off suit live against Seymour’s off suit A-10. The J-9-8 flop kept Seymour in the lead, but the 10 on the turn wasn’t something he was looking for as it gave Tosoc a King-high straight. To add insult to injury, the Ace on the river improved Seymour to a worthless two pair against Tosoc’s Broadway, sending the former NFL star to the rail in 18th place. In earning his fifth ever WPT cash, Seymour also earned his best cash ever ($ 52,174) and continues to strive for that landmark poker title that he’s working towards.

As Tosoc was ending Seymour’s day, however, he was losing the chip lead. On the other table, Romero was clashing with Rob Wazwaz on a 10-2-2-6-J board that saw Wazwaz push the final chips of his stack to the center on the river. Romero called with no concerns and, after the cards were up, it was obvious why. Romero’s A-2 had flopped the world while Wazwaz’s K-10 held a losing two pair. Romero rocketed to six million chips following the hand as Wazwaz reviewed the play of the hand in his head as he headed to the cage in 17th place.

Romero kept up the pressure on his opponents but was also the beneficiary of some fortune on Friday. He would eliminate Stephen Graner in 15th place after his A-Q flopped Aces up against Graner’s pocket Jacks, then would move on to the unofficial final table of 10 with a massive chip stack of 6.395 million. That stack only got bigger when he took down J. C. Tran in tenth place, once again holding A-Q against Tran’s pocket tens and seeing a board of Q-4-3-Q-A.

Now sitting on about a third of the chips in play, Romero didn’t exactly sit back and let everyone else decide the future final table. In fact, Romero would be the player who would end the action for the evening in what started as a three-way pot. Jake Schindler would open the betting out of the cutoff and both Romero (button) and Chris Klodnicki (big blind) came along. After a K-9-7 flop, Klodnicki fired a bet of 220K. Schindler thought it over for a bit before making the call and, after a five-minute tank of his own that brought a calling of the clock, Romero popped the action up to 510K. Warily Klodnicki made the call, as did Schindler, building the largest pot of the tournament to this point.

A turn four didn’t seem to help anyone but it would bring the final action on the hand. Both Klodnicki and Schindler checked to Romero, who put out another bet of 510K for consideration. Klodnicki didn’t believe the story that Romero was telling, moving all in over Romero’s bet, but Schindler decided that Romero had the goods. It turned out Schindler was correct as Romero showed pocket sevens for the set against Klodnicki’s K-9 (Kings up). Needing a King or a nine to top Romero, Klodnicki instead saw a five to end his tournament on the television bubble and stack Romero massively for Saturday’s action.

1. James Romero, 9.86 million
2. Ryan Tosoc, 4.465 million
3. Justin Bonomo, 3.36 million
4. Igor Yaroshevskyy, 2.57 million
5. Alex Condon, 2.265 million
6. Jake Schindler, 1.21 million

This shapes up as one of the tougher final tables in recent memory on the WPT. Schindler, even on the short stack, knows what is necessary to win as a former champion of the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $ 25,000 High Roller (2014). With his finish in this tournament, Condon will crack the $ 1 million mark in career earnings and, should he win, would rocket close to $ 3 million in earnings. Yaroshevskyy is close to $ 2 million in earnings (mostly on the European circuit) but is looking for his breakthrough championship, while Bonomo, Tosoc and Romero are known commodities.

It promises to be an entertaining battle this afternoon/evening as these six men contend for this WPT title. The winner will join such names as Gus Hansen, Daniel Negreanu, Joe Hachem, Antonio Esfandiari, Eugene Katchalov, David ‘Chino’ Rheem and Mohsin Charania as champions of this event. While that is definitely some rarefied air, the $ 1,938,118 first place check might be more of what the players are looking at.

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