Posts Tagged ‘Short’

2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event Day 5: Adrian Mateos Storms from Short Stack to Lead Final Table

 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event Day 5: Adrian Mateos Storms from Short Stack to Lead Final Table

It’s going to be difficult for anyone to come from beneath Stasiewicz and challenge for the final table, but Day 2 chip leader Oleg Titov (488K) and Mateos (236K) are ones to watch if it is to happen.” That was one of our final sentences from yesterday’s report on the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event and, sure enough, it came to pass. After 13 hours of play on Saturday, three-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner and former European Poker Tour champion Adrian Mateos emerged as the chip leader going to Sunday’s final table.

16 players started the day on Saturday with 2016 Poker Player of the Year David Peters sitting high on the top of the leaderboard. He was the only player over the three million chip mark (3.105 million), but Maria Lampropulos (2.313 million) and Adalfer Morales Gamarra (1.196 million) were willing to take on the challenge. You had to look way down the leaderboard to see Mateos, who came into Day 5 with only 236,000 in chips and looked to be one of those players heading for the rail quickly on Saturday.

Instead of exiting the Atlantis Resort Spa tournament room early, however, Mateos fought tooth and nail to stay in the event. The Spaniard check shoved his stack on the river against Jonathan West on a 9-5-6 flop to breathe some life into his stack and was able to double up through Daniel Coupal when his A-3 caught against Coupal’s pocket eights on a Q-A-10-K-Q board. Those two hands got Mateos healthy and near a million chips (919K) as the afternoon wore on.

Instead of Mateos hitting the rail, some of his fellow competitors took his place. Gamarra took down Florian Maurer in fifteenth place when Gamarra rivered a Queen with his A-Q to knock off Maurer’s pocket sixes out. The big action was at the top as players shuffled through the leader’s chair, however, as nobody seemed to get a firm grasp of the leaderboard.

Shawn Buchanan made the first big move, jumping to the lead after doubling up to 1.65 million through Gamarra. Then Michael Farrow took over the lead after eliminating Jean Ateba in fourteenth place. Lampropulos was up next, battling with Oleg Titov and coming out on the winning side to push her to 2.63 million. Finally, it was Koray Aldemir’s turn to sit at the helm, betting Farrow off the pot to crack the three million mark. This was in the span of 20 minutes!

Stasiewicz never could get anything going, ultimately dropping from the tournament in thirteenth place at the hands of Buchanan. Aldemir, still holding on to the lead, extended it in eliminating Jonathan West in twelfth place and climbing to 5.455 million. Mateos also continued his climb upward, once again using an A-3 but this time against Peters’ pocket nines, on an A-8-8-5-Q board to reach almost two million in chips; Peters could not come back from this beat, eventually falling in eleventh place at the hands of Coupal as his A-J failed against Coupal’s Big Slick.

While Peters was picking up his eleventh-place money ($ 75,640), the unofficial final table was set. Gamarra was one of the very active players during the day’s play and he was unfazed when he took his A-10 off suit against Farrow’s pocket fives. The flop was clean, but the Ace on the turn changed fortunes. Farrow, looking for one of the two fives left in the deck, instead saw a ten give Gamarra two pair and send Farrow out in tenth place.

Now at one table, the tournament wasn’t “official” yet. There was one more player that needed to be eliminated for that and three more to reach the goal set at the start of the day (six handed). Aldemir was the dominant leader at this point, his 5.915 million chips over Lampropulos’ 2.875 million, and Mateos was still in the lower levels of the leaderboard with his 1.16 million stack. The final nine headed off and, stunningly, Mateos went on a rush.

Lampropulos made the table official with her elimination of Patryk Poterek in ninth place, but the first two dozen hands were uneventful other than that. On Hand 58, however, Aldemir would lose the lead to Lampropulos when he couldn’t beat Titov pocket Queens with an A-7 off suit. Titov, however, turned around and doubled up Buchanan to make the Canadian a threat in the tournament. After taking a break following the 63rd hand of the final table, there were still eight players left.

Buchanan would use those newfound chips to mount his own charge to the lead. By the end of the next break (Hand 89), Buchanan had passed both Lampropulos and Aldemir to take over the lead. Another 90 minutes of action, however, would tell a different story.

Mateos started his march to the top by first knocking out Gamarra when Mateos’ flopped pair of eights survived the open-ended straight draw of Gamarra. Now on 3.71 million chips, Mateos stayed on the offensive, taking more chips from Aldemir when he sneakily played pocket Kings for all their worth on an 6-9-Q-6-6 board. After that hand, Mateos had won four of the previous seven hands and was in the lead with more than five million chips.

The news wasn’t so good for Titov, who was the Day 2 chip leader. His chip stack slowly slipped through his fingers until he was down to his last 600K or so in chips. After Coupal moved all in from the button on his small blind, however, Titov thought he found a point to make a stand. It turned out to be the wrong move – Coupal held a decent A-J off suit on the button but Titov could only muster a K-2 off suit for the battle. An Ace came on the flop (along with a deuce), but no one else would get anything on the trey turn and the eight river. As Titov shook hands and realized he was the television table “bubble boy,” Mateos was in firm control of the festivities.

1. Adrian Mateos, 5.675 million
2. Shawn Buchanan, 3.755 million
3. Maria Lampropulos, 3.505 million
4. Koray Aldemir, 2.34 million
5. Daniel Coupal, 1.275 million
6. Christian Rudolph, 905,000

The final table promises to be an excellent battle between players who have been on both sides of the fortune scale. Mateos’ battle back from the short stack is evident, but Buchanan, Lampropulos, Aldemir and Coupal have been fortunate to stay in the upper echelon of the leaderboard for much of the tournament. Rudolph was up in that group but, since he has sunk to the short stack, it isn’t realistic to see him winning this championship. That’s why they play tournaments to the end, however…

Today’s final table will be running simultaneously with the $ 25,000 High Roller action, so the PokerStars TV crew will be stretched covering both events. Beginning at 3:30PM (Bahamas time, 2:30PM Eastern time), the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event final table will play out with everyone guaranteed a big six figure payout ($ 229,760) and a new Hendon Mob flag. The top prize is the goal, though, where $ 1,081,100 awaits the eventual champion.

The post 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event Day 5: Adrian Mateos Storms from Short Stack to Lead Final Table appeared first on Poker News Daily.

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2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 3 – Blake Bohn Takes Over Lead Short of the Money Bubble

 2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 3 – Blake Bohn Takes Over Lead Short of the Money Bubble

Day 3 of the World Poker Tour’s Five Diamond World Poker Classic at the Bellagio in Las Vegas is in the books and, for the first time in the tournament, Brandon Meyers isn’t atop the leaderboard. While he does lurk down the ladder a bit, Blake Bohn has taken over the lead with the money bubble looming for Day 4’s action.

With 316 players remaining from the 812 entries that came in, it was a given that the money wasn’t going to be reached on Thursday. That didn’t mean there wasn’t some work to do as players looked to garner chips to get in the best position to drive deep in the event. Meyers was best situated for making that deep drive, starting Day 3 with a stack of 388,100 chips, while Daniel Strelitz (310,900) joined him as the only players above the 300K mark.

Day 3 was the longest day of the tournament so far, with seven 90-minute levels on tap for the assembled players, and they didn’t tiptoe into the waters on Thursday. A short-stacked Mike Wattel was taken down by 14-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner (but zero-time WPT champion) Phil Hellmuth moments into the start of the day, while a short-stacked former Super Bowl champion in Richard Seymour went in the other direction. Seymour would use pocket tens to outrun Joshua Ladines’ A Q on a nine-high board to get back in the race.

Wattel wasn’t the only notable pro who departed the Bellagio soon after the day’s play began. Jeremy Ausmus, Matt Berkey, Kathy Liebert, former WPT Player of the Year Mukul Pahuja and WPT champion Pat Lyons all found a spot on the rail to watch the proceedings as Mike Del Vecchio took center stage. He was able to four-bet both Shawn Buchanan and Cate Hall out of a hand to pull close to 100K, then blew by that mark by getting just Hall to lay down her hand. Del Vecchio’s continued aggression would keep his stack fluctuating but moving upwards throughout the Day 3 action.

Del Vecchio’s high water mark came in eliminating one of the biggest names in the game in the evening hours. After a raising battle between him and Daniel Negreanu, Del Vecchio was able to get Negreanu to commit his final chips pre-flop with pocket Queens. The problem for Negreanu is that Del Vecchio had pocket Kings for the cooler; once no other Ladies showed on the board, Negreanu was out of the Five Diamond, one of his favorite tournaments of the year, while Del Vecchio stacked up 345K in chips.

After being hit with the deck for the first two days of the tournament (by his own admission), Meyers had a day where he simply attempted to survive. It wasn’t until the early evening hours that Meyers was able to eke over his starting day stack to 395K, but it seemed to get his engines going. Meyers would push Andy Frankenberger to the brink before Frankenberger folded a hand and Meyers scooped up the chips to move to 483K.

As the dinner break arrived, 113 players were still alive in the tournament with two 90-minute levels left to play. Strelitz had moved to the lead at this point with 828K in chips, but he would go no higher on Day 3 and instead gave back a few chips. Bohn was the man who made the moves late in the evening in a hand against one of the top “High Roller” players in the game.

After an opening bet from Bohn, Kempe would move in for his remaining stack. Everyone else would get out of the way, but Bohn was steadfast and made the call. It turned out to be the correct decision; Bohn’s Big Slick was better than Kempe’s Big Chick (A-Q) and, after a King was in the window on the flop, the German was left drawing extremely thin. A blank on the turn meant that Kempe was now drawing dead just short of the money bubble.

Bohn would add onto his 815K stack as the players crept closer to the money. Just short of the time when the WPT “Action Clock” (the 30-second “shot clock” used by the WPT one table from the money bubble) would be activated, the last 90 players reached the end of Level 17 and bagged and tagged their booty. Bohn was the man who bagged the most, 871,000, to seize the lead heading to Day 4.

1. Blake Bohn, 871,000
2. Daniel Strelitz, 791,000
3. Sean Perry, 758,000
4. Matthew Moss, 748,500
5. Artem Markov, 674,500
6. Brandon Meyers, 638,000
7. David ‘Chino’ Rheem, 592,500
8. Chance Kornuth, 586,000
9. Matt Giannetti, 549,000
10. Satish Surapaneni, 541,000

Day 4 action at the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic kicks off at noon today with some important business to take care of. Nine players must be eliminated to get to the 81 players who’ll earn a min-cash of slightly more than $ 19K from the tournament. The WPT “Action Clock” will be employed from now until a champion is crowned, with that champion walking off with a $ 1,958,065 Christmas present.

The post 2017 WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Day 3 – Blake Bohn Takes Over Lead Short of the Money Bubble appeared first on Poker News Daily.

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2017 WSOP Championship Event Final Table, Night One: Scott Blumstein Retakes Lead as Play is Cut Short

 2017 WSOP Championship Event Final Table, Night One: Scott Blumstein Retakes Lead as Play is Cut Short

The 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event’s Night One (seems a bit odd to say that!) action is in the books and it certainly was entertaining. As the seven players (more on that in a bit) prepare to take on Night Two in a few hours, Scott Blumstein will have a monstrous lead, bigger than the one he brought to the table on Thursday night for action.

Blumstein’s 97.25 million in chips were slightly ahead of John Hesp’s 85.7 million stack, but the duo sitting beside each other didn’t look to have anyone who would challenge them. The closest competitor to the Top Two was Benjamin Pollok, whose own mountain of 35.175 million chips looked monstrous until compared to Blumstein and Hesp. Hot on Pollok’s heels was Bryan Piccioli with 33.8 million and Dan Ott was in decent shape with his 26.475 million markers. Damian Salas (22.175 million), Antoine Saout (21.75 million), Jack Sinclair (20.2 million) and a short-stacked Ben Lamb (18.5 million) rounded out those who were looking to take down the crème atop the final table.

To say that there were some fireworks to start the evening’s festivities would be a huge understatement. In fact, it wouldn’t be out of line to say that the opening salvo of hands was perhaps the most exciting in recent WSOP final table history. That the man having the most fun with his stay in Las Vegas was responsible for it would not be surprising.

Hesp came out of the gates with his guns, cannons, missiles and atom bombs of joviality and freewheeling poker decisions, entertaining the crowd in the Brasilia Room at the Rio and the millions watching at home via ESPN. On the very first hand of action, he would suck some chips out of Saout with a worse hand and, when he asked if he should show, he was egged on by the crowd (and some of his tablemates) to show the bluff right in Saout’s face. Saout’s didn’t seem pleased by the grandstanding, but it wasn’t over yet.

On the very next hand, Hesp would three-bet Ott and Ott would not be able to find the means to call. Once again egged on, Hesp showed his hand – pocket Queens (that had Ott beaten pre-flop) – that demonstrated he would make a move whether he had the goods or not. This led to the THIRD HAND of the night, in which Hesp only made a raise to get everyone out of the way. After showing his J-10 off suit as he raked in the chips, Hesp basked in the enjoyment and adulation that the entirety of the room seemed to be having and giving him.

Thus, the actions on Hand 4 of the tournament were a bit of a reality check for everyone. After Sinclair made a raise to 1.6 million off the button, Lamb decided to defend his big blind – it was only a question of how. Lamb eventually settled on moving his 18 million-chip stack to the center and an undaunted Sinclair made the call. Sinclair’s A-Q dominated the A 9 of Lamb, but the board decided it wanted to play some games. Coming down with a 6-5-4 flop, Lamb had a chance at backdoor straight and flush draws to take the hand. A turn trey eliminated the flush draws but opened some action for Lamb to a split on the open-ended straight draw.  All Lamb’s hopes were dashed, however, when a ten came on the river to eliminate him in ninth place ($ 1,000,000).

After the elimination of Lamb, a bit of seriousness seemed to settle in over the remaining eight men. Because of his early actions, Hesp had moved out to a decent lead over Blumstein, while the remainder of the field looked to catch up with them. Pollok seemed to be the best at doing this as his chip stack slowly crept up to solidify his third-place position. When there was a clash, it was between two players that probably shouldn’t have been colliding.

Normally at a final table, the two largest stacks – especially if they are in the positions that Hesp and Blumstein found themselves in – will avoid each other rather than butt heads. Thus, on Hand 47 when Blumstein opened the betting from under the gun, it was perceived that he’d get the walk about as his stack deemed. In the big blind, however, was Hesp, who called to see a flop with the only player who could hurt his stack, and the twosome saw an A-7-5 hit the felt.

Unknown to either player (but known to those watching on ESPN), a storm was brewing. Hesp had connected with his A-10 on the flop, but it was Blumenstein who was dominating with the pocket Aces he had raised with. That domination only became an evisceration when a ten hit on the turn, giving Hesp two pair but leaving him drawing dead to Blumstein’s set of Aces. That evisceration was total as, after Hesp checked his option and Blumstein bet, Hesp check-raised with his two pair. When Blumstein took no time to four-bet the action to 17 million, Hesp incorrectly moved all in and Blumstein immediately called. An innocuous trey completed the board and Blumstein rocketed back into a massive chip lead.

After Piccioli eliminated Sinclair in eighth place ($ 1.2 million), his pocket Aces ruling over Sinclair’s K♠ J♠, another 11 hands were played before a somewhat controversial decision. Roughly at 11:30PM (Pacific Time), either WSOP officials or the honchos of ESPN decided that it was time to end play for the night, short of the final six that had originally been on the schedule. Because of that decision, seven men will come back on Friday night to continue the festivities.

1. Scott Blumstein, 178.3 million
2. Benjamin Pollok, 77.525 million
3. Bryan Piccioli, 35.75 million
4. John Hesp, 22.475 million
5. Dan Ott, 16.35 million
6. Damian Salas, 15.625 million
7. Antoine Saout, 14.55 million
8. Jack Sinclair, $ 1,200,000*
9. Ben Lamb, $ 1,000,000*

(* – eliminated on Thursday night)

Play resumes this evening at 6PM (Pacific Time, 9PM Eastern Time), at which point the final seven will play down to the final three combatants. This will be the final stoppage for the 2017 World Series of Poker Championship Event as, on Saturday night, a new World Champion will be crowned.

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2016 World Series of Poker, Preliminary Events: Colossus II Falls Short of 2015, $10K Stud Led by Steve Weiss

 2016 World Series of Poker, Preliminary Events: Colossus II Falls Short of 2015, $10K Stud Led by Steve Weiss

The first Saturday of the 2016 World Series of Poker saw the tournament arenas around the Rio packed with a plethora of players of all types. For those with a shortened bankroll, the “Colossus II” rumbled on with its final two flights, while those with a bit more change in their pockets chose to take on the challenge of Seven Card Stud to the tune of $ 10,000.

Event #2 – Colossus II $ 565 No Limit Texas Hold’em

After the four previous flights garnered a total of 12,271 entries, it was obvious that WSOP officials were hoping the final two flights for “Colossus II” would be gangbusters. Although the two flights were the largest of the six openers, they failed to draw in enough players to eclipse the numbers from the inaugural tournament. After these totals were tacked to the end of the list on Saturday:

Flight A:  3249 registered players/121 remaining players
Flight B:  2153/69
Flight C:  3770/139
Flight D:  3099/105
Flight E:  4855/219
Flight F:  4487/192

21,613 entries had been received for the tournament and 845 players will come back on Sunday for Day 2 of “Colossus II.”

To compare the 2016 version of the event – which featured six starting flights – to the 2015 version – which featured four starting flights – there is room for concern. The 2015 event was monstrous in drawing out 22,374 entries, by far the largest ever event in WSOP history (estimates are that there were approximately 14,000 singular people in the tournament). The 3% drop in players might not be tremendously significant but, if it starts to stretch out across the other events at the WSOP (next weekend’s Millionaire Maker, for example, with its $ 1500 buy in), it could pose a problem.

With all the flights in the books, here are your Flight Leaders who will be around the top of the leaderboard when action resumes on Sunday at 2PM:

Flight A:  David Polop, 513,000
Flight B:  Jason James, 407,000
Flight C:  Ben Lindemulder, 362,000
Flight D:  Brian Graham, 416,000
Flight E:  Hai Nguyen, 392,000
Flight F:  Norman Michalek, 531,000

Everyone who returns on Sunday is guaranteed a payday that will be a minimum of $ 2155 (the WSOP paid out each Flight’s top 15%, meaning some players were eliminated on Day 1 but still received a payday for their efforts), but that number might be flexible pending final counts from WSOP officials. The big prize that all are looking at is the $ 1 million guaranteed for the first place finisher, which will be awarded on Tuesday along with the WSOP bracelet.

Event #3 – $ 10,000 Seven Card Stud World Championship

It is where everyone normally – at least prior to 2000 – got their start playing poker. Seven Card Stud is the game that families most often spread with each other when playing nice home games for M&Ms on the kitchen table. It is, however, one of the more difficult disciplines of poker to master as reflected by the 87 players who came to the felt for the WSOP’s $ 10,000 Seven Card Stud World Championship on Saturday afternoon.

There was nary a table that wasn’t replete with top professionals looking to potentially get their first action of the 2016 WSOP and, for some, it worked out better than others. Down to his last chips at one point in the tournament (literally, he had one bet left), Jean-Robert Bellande demonstrated tremendous resiliency in coming back to finish the night’s work with 282,500 in chips. Others such as former WSOP Player of the Years George Danzer (274K) and Jeff Lisandro (141K) were joined by 14-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth (65K) and Brandon Shack-Harris (79K), who had a particularly interesting clash during Saturday’s action.

With his four up cards showing K-8-7-9, Hellmuth went to Seventh Street with Shack-Harris, who showed 10-A-4-J for battle. According to WSOP live coverage reports, Hellmuth commented over to Shack-Harris, “I had kings up (two pair) early,” but he didn’t show his cards. Meanwhile, Shack-Harris showed his down cards – A-10-8 – to show that he held a better two pair. “Are you f****ng kidding me?” Hellmuth fumed as his cards went to the muck. He would continue to berate Shack-Harris for a bit before regaining his composure.

If those thunderbolts weren’t enough, there was also the reemergence of former World Champion Chris Ferguson on the WSOP stage. Not seen at the WSOP since 2010 due to “Black Friday,” Ferguson was one of the last players to register for the event, but the rust was obvious. After only 90 minutes of play, Ferguson was eliminated from the tournament, joining 54 other players who plopped down $ 10,000 for a shot at this title.

Leading the final 33 players will be Steve Weiss, who quietly worked his way through Day 1 to eclipse Bellande for the chip lead:

1. Steve Weiss, 301,500
2. Jean-Robert Bellande, 282,500
3. George Danzer, 274,000
4. Chad J. Brown, 238,000
5. Rod Pardey, 215,000
6. Calvin Anderson, 209,000
7. Frank Kassela, 199,000
8. Matt Grapenthien, 178,500

The top 14 players will earn at least $ 14,500 from the $ 817,800 prize pool, but the champion will earn the lion’s share of $ 242,662 and the WSOP bracelet.

STARTING TODAY

Two more tournaments will get underway on Sunday alongside “Colossus II” and the Stud World Championship. At 11AM today, the $ 1000 “Top Up” Turbo No Limit Hold’em tournament, Event #4 on your schedule, this event allows players to earn an extra 5000 starting chips by playing on WSOP.com or by outright purchasing an additional 5000 starting chips before the event starts. As it is a new event, there are no indicators how well this tournament will be received by the players.

At 3PM, the $ 1500 Six Handed Dealer’s Choice event will begin. This event allows each “dealer” (player) to pick from one of 19 different poker variants and basically “name the game.” The usual suspects are there – Texas and Omaha Hold’em variants and Stud – but such games as Badugi and No Limit Five Card Draw High also are available for the players to pick. Carol Fuchs defeated a 357-player field to capture a $ 127,735 payday and her first WSOP bracelet in the 2015 version of this tournament.

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In the money but short stacked

 In the money but short stacked
Actively playing the Carbon Poker 2014 freeroll previous night time. Experienced about 7500 in chips still left, in center situation. Blinds at 1000/2000. I am dealt a pair of nines. It was folded to me. What is a great perform below?

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